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Giving USA

Join Jeffrey D. Byrne for an expert panel discussion on how public policy and legislative issues are impacting philanthropy

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Over the last few years, the nonprofit sector has seen an increased level of interest on the part of elected officials, particularly on the federal level, in public policy and legislative issues impacting the sector. These issues range from the charitable tax deduction, to foundation and donor-advised fund “pay out” to PILOTs or other use taxes at the state or municipal level.

Join JB+A’s Jeffrey Byrne for a live webcast of an expert panel discussion on these issues that will affect our sector and how we can educate legislators on their impact.

July 14
10:00 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Central Time

Tax Policy and Other Changes in the Political Wind
hosted by The Giving Institute

Register now for this complimentary, live webcast

Panelists:
Suzanne T. Allen, Ph.D., President and CEO of Philanthropy Ohio
Jeffrey D. Byrne, Chair, The Giving Institute
Robert Collier, President & CEO, Michigan Council on Foundations
Sally Ehrenfried, Senior Manager, Philanthropy and Volunteer Engagement, Blackbaud

Moderator:
Jon Biedermann, Vice President, DonorPerfect

Be sure to read Jeffrey’s takeaways from Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016 for background on the state of fundraising in the U.S.

As members of The Giving Institute — Jeffrey D. Byrne is the 2015-2017 Chair of its Board of Directors — JB+A is pleased to share this special opportunity with you.

The Giving Institute, since 1935, has championed thought leadership on philanthropy and fundraising in the nonprofit sector. Through the Giving USA Foundation, The Giving Institute produces the Giving USA Annual Report on Philanthropy and other reports and partners with several groups to provide valuable research, data and thought leadership on topics and trends impacting charitable giving.

 

Key Takeaways from Dr. Rooney’s KC Presentation of Giving USA 2017

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JB+A was proud to join U.S. Trust and Nonprofit Connect in hosting Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016 in Kansas City on June 16 at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.  2017 marked JB+A’s 12th year of bringing Giving USA to Kansas City, and this year’s report was presented by Dr. Patrick Rooney, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research and Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Here are some Key Takeaways from Dr. Rooney’s presentation of the Giving USA 2017 report:

Philanthropy and Politics
“More people donate each year than vote,” explained Dr. Rooney, “and the issues most spoken about in 2016 political dialogue were the recipients of the most giving: arts/culture/humanities, environment/animals, health and international affairs.”  Dr. Rooney stressed this may or may not be a “causal” relationship, but pointed out the correlation was hard to ignore. And we may see more clearly the true impact of this “politically-motivated” type of giving in 2017 data.

Giving by Foundations and the 5% Payout Rate
While giving by all three types of foundations – independent, operating and community – increased, the growth was more moderate in 2016.  “Giving by Foundations is more predictable, because of the 5% payout rate*,” said Dr. Rooney, “And independent foundations provided the majority of grantmaking in both 2015 and 2016.” This moderate rise in giving may be attributable to a two-year lagged effect from S&P 500 performance.

But in the midst of ongoing scrutiny and debate about whether private foundations distribute a big enough portion of their assets, Dr. Rooney shared his analysis on increasing the payout rate: “We ran some numbers, to see if increasing the payout rate to 10% would bankrupt foundations.  It would take more than 100 years for that to happen, so in short, the empirical evidence is that increasing the payout rate would not bankrupt foundations.”

*Refers to the payout requirement that is the minimum amount private foundations must spend each year for charitable purposes. By law, private non-operating foundations must distribute five percent of the value of their net investment assets annually in the form of grants or eligible administrative expenses.

Public-Society Benefit and Donor-Advised Funds
Dr. Rooney recognized that “not everyone understands the composition of the Public-Society Benefit subsector.” Organizations within this category include those related to voter education, civil rights, civil liberties, consumer rights and community/economic development as well as free-standing research institutions (for the sciences and public policy.)  This subsector also includes organizations that raise funds to distribute to nonprofits, such as the United Way, Combined Federal Campaigns and Jewish Federations.

National donor-advised funds (such as Fidelity, Schwab and Vanguard) are also included in Public-Society Benefit, and Dr. Rooney noted we are seeing strong increases in contributions to these types of giving vehicles.  “For only the second time since The Chronicle of Philanthropy initiated the Philanthropy 400 in 1991, United Way Worldwide was not listed as the top charity,” explained Dr. Rooney. “Fidelity Charitable took the top spot. In 2015, contributions to Fidelity Charitable grew 20% over 2014, while United Way saw a 4% drop in charitable receipts.”

Dr. Rooney offered that being able to continue to disaggregate donor-advised funds data in this category will shed more light on this topic.

Individual Giving and its Share of the Pie
Individual giving has declined from 84% of total giving in the five-year period ending in 1981 to 72% of total giving in the five-year period ending in 2016.  But Dr. Rooney reassured us individuals/households are still giving, they’re just doing so in more formalized ways (such as through private foundations and donor-advised funds) and reminded us that the single largest contributor to the increase in total charitable giving in 2016 was the increase of $10.53 billion in giving by individuals. He also pointed out the “democratization of philanthropy in 2016,” explaining that “The strong growth in individual giving may be less attributable to the largest of the large gifts*, which were not as robust as we have seen in prior years – suggesting this growth may have come from donors among the general population.”

Dr. Rooney stressed the power to increase giving is in our hands: “If every American household reallocated $5 a day of frivolous consumption to philanthropy, that would double household giving overnight.”  Dr. Rooney added, “It’s up to us as donors, but also as nonprofits – we need to make the case for philanthropy.”

*Giving USA refers to very large gifts as “mega-gifts” and sets that threshold every year.  In 2016, gifts of $200 million and above were tracked as mega-gifts.

Be sure to check out Jeffrey Byrne’s Top Five Ways Nonprofits Can Use Giving USA to improve their fundraising and JB+A’s recap of Giving USA 2017  findings.

Download the two traditional pie charts illustrating 2016 source contributions and recipients and share with Board members, your CEO and development staff.

Top Five Ways Nonprofits Can Use Giving USA

By | All Posts, Boards + Leadership, Capacity Building, Commentary, Current Events/News, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Giving USA, Insights, Stewardship, The Giving Institute | No Comments

Giving USA is a powerful tool:  it is the most trusted annual report on the sources and uses of philanthropy in the U.S., but it’s also a valuable resource in helping us improve philanthropy.  Nonprofit organizations can (and should) use Giving USA to help identify trends as well as opportunities to strengthen resource development efforts.

Here are my Top Five Ways Nonprofits Can Use Giving USA to improve their fundraising:

5. Understand the correlations between giving and economic factors
The stock market, personal wealth, personal income, GDP, corporate pre-tax profits and unemployment rates impact giving by all four sources (individuals, foundations, bequests and corporations). Trends are closely monitored by people “inside” and “outside” the philanthropy sector.
Be aware of changes in these indicators, anticipate how changes will impact donors and adjust fundraising strategies accordingly

4. Confirm or dispel myths about giving
Economic and political scenarios, complex societal issues, diverse giving platforms, wealth and capacity are just some of the drivers behind philanthropy.
Understand the context of these drivers, help manage expectations about giving and set realistic and achievable goals

3. Educate Board members, volunteers, donors and staff about the broad context of philanthropic giving
Help stakeholders better understand your organization’s funding patterns and potential

2. Be nimble in your fundraising and stewardship
Nonprofit fundraising must evolve as philanthropy evolves.  We are seeing an increase in the popularity of non-traditional giving vehicles (such as donor-advised funds and non-cash assets) and donors want more evidence of the impact of their gifts.
Listen to your donors and prospective donors – and tailor your strategies to match their needs and expectations

1. Recognize the “individual giving effect”
An estimated 87% of total giving in 2016 came from individuals, bequests and family foundations.
There are human beings involved in every gift; focus on developing and maintaining meaningful relationships

And remember:

Strengthen your case for support:  the best cases are realistic, relevant and compelling while being supported by the facts and clearly communicating the purpose, programs and financial needs of your organization.

Celebrate your impact: Americans give an average of more than $1 billion a day to help others.  Nonprofits and donors are doing great work.

Giving makes a difference, to both giver and recipient, but we can do more.  So spread the word about the good philanthropy has done – and the good it will continue to do.

I encourage you to download the two traditional pie charts illustrating 2016 source contributions and recipients and share with Board members, your CEO and development staff.

View JB+A’s recap of Giving USA 2017  findings here.

Check out key takeaways from Dr. Rooney’s 2017 Giving USA presentation in Kansas City.

About Giving USA
For over 60 years, Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy in America, has produced comprehensive charitable giving data that are relied on by donors, fundraisers and nonprofit leaders. The research in this annual report estimates all giving to all charitable organizations across the United States.  Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA FoundationTM and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Giving USA FoundationTM, established in 1985 by The Giving Institute, endeavors to advance philanthropy through research and education. Explore Giving USA products and resources, including free highlights of each annual report at its online store at www.givingusa.org for more information.

About The Giving Institute
The Giving Institute, the parent organization of Giving USA FoundationTM, consists of member organizations that have embraced and embodied the core values of ethics, excellence and leadership in advancing philanthropy. Serving clients of every size and purpose, from local institutions to international organizations, The Giving Institute member organizations embrace the highest ethical standards and maintain a strict code of fair practices. For information on selecting fundraising counsel, visit www.givinginstitute.org. Jeffrey Byrne has the honor of Chairing The Giving Institute Board of Directors (2015-2017).

Giving USA 2017: An Estimated $390.05 Billion to Charity in 2016

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Giving by American Individuals, Foundations, Estates and Corporations Reaches a New High for the Third Straight Year
Giving by individuals drove the rise in total giving; all nine major philanthropy subsectors experienced giving increases–
for the sixth time in the last four decades

Jeffrey Byrne + Associates, Inc., U. S. Trust and Nonprofit Connect recently presented Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016 in Kansas City. Special guest Dr. Patrick RooneyAssociate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research and Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy shared highlights from the report to a full house at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation Conference Center. 

Americans donated an estimated $390.05 billion to charity in 2016, achieving an all-time high for the third year in a row. This figure also represents a 2.7 percent growth in current dollars (1.4 percent when adjusted for inflation) over the revised estimate of $379.89 billion for total giving in 2015. Total giving cumulatively grew 6.8 percent between 2014 and 2016.

These findings are contained in Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016.  The seminal report on charitable giving, Giving USA is the longest-running and most comprehensive evaluation of philanthropic trends in the United States. Giving USA is published by the Giving USA Foundation and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

The single largest contributor to the increase in total charitable giving was an increase of $10.53 billion (3.9 percent over 2015) in giving by individuals. “Despite three quarters of stock market volatility in 2016 and a turbulent election season, individual giving continued its incredibly important role in American philanthropy,” said Jeffrey D. Byrne, President + CEO of Jeffrey Byrne + Associates, Inc. “In addition, this strong growth in individual giving appears to be less attributable to ‘mega gifts,’ which were not as robust as in previous years, suggesting more of that growth came from donors in the general population.” Byrne is also Board Chair of The Giving Institute, sister organization to the Giving USA Foundation, a public service and public trust dedicated to providing the highest-quality information about philanthropy.

Giving to all nine major categories of recipient organizations grew, making 2016 just the sixth time in the past 40 years that this has occurred:  religion, education, human services, giving to foundations, health, public-society benefit, arts/culture/humanities, international affairs and environment/animals. “This growth in every major sector illustrates the resilience of philanthropy and the diversity of donor motivation,” said Byrne. “It also reinforces the importance of getting to know our donors better.”

As has long been demonstrated, there continued to be a link between the economy and charitable giving trends in 2016. National-level economic indicators include personal consumption, disposable personal income and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index – all of which are associated with households’ permanent and long-term financial stability and affect giving. In 2016, both personal consumption and disposable personal income grew by nearly 4.0 percent over 2015. The S&P 500 finished the year up 9.5 percent after uneven performance for much of 2016 and a mixed economic picture in 2015. Total giving as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) continues to hover around 2.0 percent as it has for the last six years.

Download the two traditional pie charts illustrating 2016 source contributions and recipients here.

Be sure to check out Jeffrey Byrne’s Top Five Ways Nonprofits Can Use Giving USA.

Check out key takeaways from Dr. Rooney’s 2017 Giving USA presentation in Kansas City.

The Numbers for 2016 Charitable Giving by Source
Three of the four sources that comprise total giving—individuals (72 percent of the total), corporations (5.0 percent) and foundations (15 percent)—increased their 2016 donations to America’s more than 1.2 million charities, according to the report.

 Giving by individuals totaled an estimated $281.86 billion, rising 3.9 percent (2.6 percent adjusted for inflation) in 2016. Giving by individuals grew at a higher rate than the other sources of giving.

  Giving by foundations increased 3.5 percent (2.2 percent adjusted for inflation) to an estimated $59.28 billion in 2016. Giving by foundations rose more slowly in 2016 compared to the stronger increases seen in recent years. Data on foundation giving are provided by Foundation Center.

  Giving by corporations is estimated to have increased by 3.5 percent (2.3 percent adjusted for inflation) in 2016, totaling $18.55 billion. Corporate giving increased modestly in 2016, in the wake of slower GDP growth and little movement in the share of pre-tax profits directed to giving.

 Giving by bequest totaled an estimated $30.36 billion in 2016, declining 9.0 percent (10.1 percent adjusted for inflation) from 2015. Gifts from bequests frequently fluctuate from year to year and are less influenced by economic factors.

The Numbers for 2016 Gifts to Charitable Organizations
Giving USA’s research also examines what happens within nine different recipient categories of charities.  In 2016, giving increased to all subsectors, but there were deviations from patterns seen in recent years. Giving to education saw relatively slower growth than in previous years and giving to international affairs, humans services and public-society benefit organizations grew despite few widely publicized natural disasters, which often drive contributions to these types of organizations. Environment/animal organizations experienced the fastest rate of growth of the nine subsectors in 2016, at 7.2 percent.

 Giving to religion increased 3.0 percent (1.8 percent adjusted for inflation), with an estimated $122.94 billion in contributions.

 

 Giving to education is estimated to have increased 3.6 percent (2.3 percent adjusted for inflation) to $59.77 billion.

 

 Giving to human services increased by an estimated 4.0 percent (2.7 percent adjusted for inflation), totaling $46.80 billion.

 

Giving to foundations is estimated to have increased by 3.1 percent (1.8 percent adjusted for inflation), rising to $40.56 billion.

 

Giving to health organizations is estimated to have increased by 5.7 percent (4.4 percent adjusted for inflation), to $33.14 billion.

 

 Giving to public-society benefit organizations increased by an estimated 3.7 percent (2.5 percent adjusted for inflation) to $29.89 billion.

 

 Giving to arts, culture and humanities is estimated to have increased 6.4 percent (5.1 percent adjusted for inflation) to $18.21 billion.

 

 Giving to international affairs is estimated to be $22.03 billion in 2016, an increase of 5.8 percent (4.6 percent adjusted for inflation).

 

 Giving to environment and animal organizations is estimated to have increased 7.2 percent (5.8 percent adjusted for inflation) to $11.05 billion.

Giving to individuals is estimated to have declined 2.5 percent (3.7 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars) to $7.12 billion. The bulk of these donations are in-kind gifts of medications to patients in need, made through the Patient Assistance Programs (PAPs) of pharmaceutical companies’ operating foundations.

New to this year’s edition of Giving USA is a special section on donor-advised funds, which provides analysis of major trends in both giving to and from these charitable vehicles.  Contributions to national donor-advised funds (such as Fidelity Charitable Fund, Schwab Charitable Fund, Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program and National Philanthropic Trust) are counted in the Public-Society Benefit subsector, and the proportion of giving to these funds as a percentage of giving to Public-Society Benefit has increased dramatically in recent years. Giving to donor-advised funds held in community foundations is counted in the Giving to Foundations subsector. Charitable giving to Foundations recovered in 2016 after a decline in 2015.

“As philanthropy is evolving, so are the tools and platforms through which people give,” says Byrne.  “As giving in America continues to reach new heights, I hope everyone can find ways to give that are meaningful for them, and feel confident that their giving is making a powerful difference and improving the way we all live.”

Explore Giving USA products and resources, including free highlights of each annual report at its online store at www.givingusa.org for more information.

The Giving Institute, the parent organization of Giving USA FoundationTM, consists of member organizations that have embraced and embodied the core values of ethics, excellence and leadership in advancing philanthropy. The Giving Institute member organizations embrace the highest ethical standards and maintain a strict code of fair practices. For information, visit www.givinginstitute.org.

For more information about the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy visit www.philanthropy.iupui.edu.

Giving and the Golden Years: A Special Report from GUSA

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The JB+A Team was delighted to attend The Giving Institute’s March Meeting in Las Vegas last week for two days of insight, discussion and projection for the philanthropic sector. The Giving Institute is designed to help elevate the fundraising consulting and nonprofit services industry and enhance philanthropy across the United States. JB+A is the only Kansas City firm to be accepted to The Giving Institute and has been a member since 2005.

The March Meeting brings together Giving Institute members from all over the country for governance meetings and engaging educational sessions. This year’s meeting also offered a Mentor Series for professionals new to consulting. The Mentor Series involved a full day of educational sessions and workshops for an intimate group of twenty burgeoning consultants.

As Chair of the Board of Directors for The Giving Institute, Jeffrey Byrne opened and moderated Giving in the Golden Years, a live webcast on philanthropy and aging services. The panel included John Feather, Chief Executive Officer of Grantmakers In Aging, and Tom Hofmann, Ohio Living Chief Foundation Officer. John and Tom discussed and took questions on the Giving USA Special Report, Giving and the Golden Years: The Role of Private Giving in Aging Services Organizations, which provides a first-of-its-kind benchmark of the national aging services landscape, including information on state-by-state coverage and how these critical organizations are supported financially.

Here are a few core takeaways from this fascinating discussion on the future of aging services.

Aging is a Hard Sell

“Children are an investment. Old people are an expense.” This is what a philanthropist told one of our panelists recently. Aging is a reality that we tend to have trouble facing and this tendency to put other social services above aging has left us unprepared for the demand. According to their report, only 3% of American philanthropy goes to aging and only 2% from foundations.

Philanthropy to the Rescue

Twenty-five years ago there was no resource for aging organizations to understand how to lead their organizations into the future, and they have suffered as a result. There has been a lag in understanding that philanthropy can have a huge impact on performance. One of the most compelling findings from the report was the untapped potential for the sector to grow and thrive if only aging organizations and their CEOs engaged philanthropy as a serious component of their strategic plans.

All About the Pitch

There is little evidence that the baby boomers and established foundations will organically shift their focus to aging services as they themselves age. And the typical sales pitch for aging services organizations isn’t compelling enough. The panelists argue that a better approach is to focus on how your organization has an impact on the community at large. As a CEO or fundraiser, ask yourself: is my aging center part of a broader context that makes the community a better place to live for everyone, not just our residents? If funders can be convinced that you are part of a bigger philanthropic picture, they will be more compelled to give.

Your Own Worst Enemy

So why have aging services organizations lagged in adopting contributed revenue as a business driver? Mainly leaders struggle to view philanthropy as a long-term investment. When money is already short, investing in a strategy that could take years to produce a ROI feels risky to many CEOs.  There is also an ongoing battle to right the mentality that launching a fundraising component is giving up and/or exploiting fragile seniors. If a CEO is ready to implement fundraising, it’s important to educate staff and the Board as to what philanthropy really means and its potential to transform the organization if it has the right buy-in. The panelists are big believers in forming task forces to change the culture of your organization from within. Find a small group of trusted supporters of your fundraising initiative to have an open dialogue with your staff and Board about philanthropy. Institutional commitment to philanthropy is the key to fundraising success!

No Time Like the Present

Uncertainty in federal budget cuts has made foundations more cautious. If major budget cuts are passed, foundations will be called upon for major support from nonprofit organizations who haven’t considered diversified sources of funding. The panelists warn that we will see more hesitation from foundations to fund major projects/programs until there is more clarity from Washington. NOW is the time to talk to all your institutional funders in your local community. But don’t put all your eggs in one basket. The bulk of your fundraising should be cultivating individual donors over a long period of time.

To listen to the recording of the webcast click here and to purchase the full report click here. 

Giving in America Exhibition at National Museum of American History

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The National Museum of American History is currently featuring an exhibition on the history and evolution of American philanthropy. The exhibition examines how our national ideals of participation, equality, resourcefulness and shared responsibility have shaped a distinctive form of giving that is uniquely American.

deliveryserviceOne of the artifacts on display is a 1960 copy of the Giving USA report on fundraising statistics and trends published by the American Association of Fundraising Counsel (now known as The Giving Institute). As Jeffrey Byrne carries out his duties as Board Chair of The Giving Institute, we are delighted to see the inclusion of this report.

To learn more about the Giving in America exhibition, please click here to visit the Smithsonian’s website.

Jeffrey Byrne Re-Elected Chair of The Giving Institute

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Representing National Consultant Thought Leaders in Philanthropy 

Jeffery ByrneThe JB+A Team is proud to announce Jeffrey D. Byrne, firm President + CEO, has been re-elected to Chair of the Board of Directors of The Giving Institute. The Giving Institute is designed to help elevate the fundraising consulting and nonprofit services industry and enhance the philanthropic sector. JB+A is the only Kansas City firm to be accepted to The Giving Institute and has been a member since 2005.

giving_institute_logoThe Giving Institute was originally founded in 1935, and beyond its original charge of promoting the evolution of a professional and ethical fundraising field, its other commitment is to promoting philanthropy. To this end, in 1955, it first published Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy and later incorporated the Giving USA Foundation to carry out and expand its public service goals.  Today, Giving USA is the most influential publication reporting on the sources and uses of longitudinal giving data for the past 62 years in the United States.

In his role as Chair of the Board, Jeffrey will continue to serve on the Giving USA Foundation Board. This term marks the 12th year that Jeffrey has served on The Giving Institute Board and his 8th year on the Executive Committee. Jeffrey leverages his position with The Giving Institute to bring more awareness to the field of philanthropy, and has been quoted in the New York Times and numerous television, periodical and radio interviews.

“These next 12 months will continue to be very special to me and JB+A, as I begin my second year in this role. It is an honor and privilege to serve in a leadership capacity for this great organization and for philanthropy,” says Jeffrey. “I am proud to work alongside such committed fellow Board members to elevate the nonprofit services industry and to enhance the impactful work being done through philanthropy.”

For more information about The Giving Institute, visit www.GivingInstitute.org .

For more information about Giving USA FoundationTM visit www.GivingUSA.org.

Catch Jeffrey Byrne on KC Cares

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KC Cares June 20 2016

JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne with KC Cares host Bill Brandmeyer

JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne is a regular guest on KC Cares, a weekly 60-minute radio program by, for and about the Kansas City nonprofit community. It is produced by KC Creative in association with Union Broadcasting.

Jeffrey spoke about Giving USA 2016: The Annual Report on Philanthropy during his appearance with KC Cares on June 20.  You can listen to the podcast of the show here.

KC Cares is a means to raise awareness of the activities of local and national nonprofits, highlight their upcoming events and interview guest experts on issues of importance to the nonprofit community.

KC Cares is broadcast live at 3:00 pm every Monday on ESPN 1510 AM. It’s also streamed from the 1510 website a little after 3:00 pm on Mondays.

Top 5 Ways Nonprofits Can Use Giving USA

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Jeffery ByrneJeffrey D. Byrne, President + CEO

Every year, I truly enjoy pouring over the data in Giving USA.  But I also realize Giving USA is so much more than the annual report on philanthropy – it’s a valuable tool to help improve philanthropy.   Nonprofit organizations can use Giving USA to help identify trends in their sector as well as successes and opportunities for improvement in resource development.

Here are my top 5 ways to “own the numbers” and use Giving USA to improve your nonprofit fundraising efforts:

5.  Identify the factors impacting philanthropy in general and in your subsector; benchmark your fundraising performance against national averages and adjust fundraising strategies accordingly

4.  Understand the correlations between giving and other economic factors, such as the stock market, personal disposable income and GDP — these are trends closely monitored by even those working “outside” the philanthropy sector; educate Board members, constituencies and prospective donors about these factor that influence giving

3.  Confirm or dispel myths about giving; help manage expectations about giving and set realistic and achievable goals

2.  Educate Board members, volunteers, donors and staff about the broad context of philanthropic giving; help them better understand your organization’s funding patterns and potential

1.  Become familiar with the reported motivations behind household charitable giving; tailor conversations and appeals to match the interests of donors

And remember…

Be flexible: nonprofit fundraising must evolve as philanthropy evolves.  We are seeing an increase in the popularity of non-traditional giving vehicles and donors want more evidence of the impact of their gifts.

Be cognizant of the “individual giving effect”:  an estimated 88% of total giving in 2015 came from individuals, bequests and family foundations.  This drives home the importance of developing and maintaining meaningful relationships.

Strengthen your case for support:  the best cases are realistic, relevant and compelling while being supported by the facts and clearly communicating the purpose, programs and financial needs of your organization.

Celebrate your impact: Americans give an average of $1 billion a day to help others.  Giving continues to grow, and there is confidence it will return to or exceed pre-recession levels.  Nonprofits and donors are doing great work.

Giving makes a difference, to both giver and recipient, but there is undoubtedly room to do more.  So spread the word about the good philanthropy has done – and the good it will continue to do.

-Jeffrey

I’m happy to share the two traditional pie charts illustrating 2015 source contributions and recipients. Click here to download.