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#GivingTuesday: Behold…Billboards!

By | Current Events/News, News You Can Use, Social Media, Technology, Volunteers | No Comments

The largest provider of outdoor advertising in Kansas City is again collaborating with JB+A to support #GivingTuesday. Since the inception of #GivingTuesday in 2012, Lamar has generously provided pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City area to promote this global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, Lamar is donating eight boards over a two-week period, for an estimated 2,786,382 viewing impressions!

Dave Halpin, Sales Manager for Lamar in Kansas City, shared his thoughts on the importance of #GivingTuesday: “As the largest provider for outdoor advertising in Kansas City, Lamar embraces this opportunity to support #GivingTuesday for the fifth consecutive year.  We are committed to doing anything we can to make this community stronger while demonstrating the giving spirit embraced by all of our employees.”

Thank you, Lamar Advertising, for this continued partnership in support of #GivingTuesday!

 #GivingTuesday 2017 is a week away!  (Nov. 28) Every year since its inception, the #GivingTuesday movement has had increasing success.  Last year, 98 countries participated through 2.4 million social media impressions and 1.64 million gifts to raise $177 million online.  What will 2017 bring?

Anyone, anywhere can get involved in #GivingTuesday. And no matter who you are – individual, family, nonprofit, business – JB+A wants YOU to join the movement:  spread the word, support a cause, make a gift, share your story.

Check out the JB+A #GivingTuesday Guide here.

Legislative Update: How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Might Affect your Nonprofit

By | All Posts, Current Events/News, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, The Giving Institute | No Comments

UPDATE:

On Dec. 2, the Senate passed its version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (S.1). Now that each chamber has passed a version of the bill, it must go to a conference committee to work through differences and draft a single version of the bill that will be sent for another vote in both the House and Senate. If it passes those, then it will go to the President for signature.

On November 1, The House released H.R. 1, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, with several representatives from the nonprofit sector voicing concerns that it would generate dramatic and negative consequences for America’s nonprofits and their constituents.

The Senate bill on tax reform was released November 9, and while many analysts in our sector feel the Senate’s version is not as potentially damaging as that of the House, there are still concerns that the bill does not fully address the components necessary to preserve charitable giving, as it limits the charitable deduction rather than expanding it to all taxpayers by way of a universal charitable deduction. Read The Independent Sector’s summary of the Senate’s tax reform  and its recommended call to action.

The Charitable Giving Coalition is urging all members of the Senate Finance Committee to vote yes on an amendment introduced by Senators Debbie Stabenow and Ron Wyden that would allow an above-the-line deduction for charitable contributions. The maximum deduction would be limited to 60% of modified adjusted gross income and would phase out at higher income levels (by 3% for every dollar of taxable income above $266,700 for single taxpayers, $320,000 for married, and $293,550 for head of household.  View the Coalition’s full release here.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and the Charitable Giving Coalition are urging everyone to continue to reach out to the U.S. Senate regarding its tax reform bill and push Senators to support a universal charitable deduction.  Visit AFP’s website for talking points and sample messaging for communicating with your Senator.

Even though the Thanksgiving holiday is approaching, please reach out to your two U.S. Senators, and encourage your Board members to do so as well.  Your engagement in this critical issue matters.

Making the Case for a Young Advisory Board

By | All Posts, Boards + Leadership, Capacity Building, Donor Cultivation, News You Can Use, Volunteers | No Comments

Katie Lord, Vice President

As millennials progress in their careers and experience increases in their income, the corporate and philanthropic landscape will continue to shift. This age group is not only changing the workplace dynamic, it is changing the philanthropic landscape – from expectations to involvement.  It is critical to develop and offer engagement opportunities for those born between approximately 1982 and 2000 (known as the “giving generation”) – both for making financial contributions and volunteering – as millennials spur new and innovative changes to charitable giving.

In a recent report released by Dunham + Company, 22% of millennials plan to give more this year than they did last year. In 2016, millennials gave an average of $580 and an average of 40 volunteer hours. While this puts them at the lower end of financial support, millennials are the largest active generation in the workforce today and are starting to approach middle management levels. The nonprofits that harness this generation’s time and talents early will reap the benefits of their treasures later.

As millennials progress in their careers and leadership journeys, many are looking for ways to give back to organizations they care about – but in very “hands-on” ways that afford them a “seat at the table” or a chance to “lean in.” Millennials who are driven by achievement and a strong sense of social responsibility actively seek civic opportunities for service.  Creating a Young Advisory Board is a fantastic way to engage them.

Service opportunities through a Young Advisory Board allow your nonprofit to cultivate this generation, while simultaneously filling your pipeline with potential high performing Board members in the future.  It is important to set up structure, roles, responsibilities and clear expectations that create accountabilities for this group, which mirror the governing Board of Directors. A challenging aspect of working with the millennial constituency is striking a balance of nonprofit staff oversight with group autonomy. You want the Young Advisory Board to be a working board (and not turn into a social or happy hour club) while achieving goals that benefit your organization and those you serve.

In order to set up your Young Advisory Board effectively, here are some best practices to consider:

  • Young Advisory Boards should have between 12 to 15 members
    • Prospective Board members should submit an application and be interviewed
    • Board members should receive and sign off on a job description
    • Board members should represent a diverse spectrum of companies, gender and ethnicities
  • Officer/Executive Committee positions include President, Vice President, Treasurer and Secretary
    • Note, the President should be a non-voting member on the Board of Directors and invited to attend meetings
  • Set an individual fundraising “give” expectation – this does not have to be a large amount but does need to be an annual gift not tied to an event
  • Set a group fundraising “get” goal that can to be accomplished throughout the year utilizing peer-to-peer fundraising or an event organized by Young Advisory Board members; this is in addition to the individual fundraising “give” expectation
  • Meeting dates and times and length of meetings should be set and agreed upon by the group for greater buy-in and accountability

The above list contains some good starting points to consider when creating a Young Advisory Board.  Your culture, mission and Young Advisory Board leadership will drive many of the roles and expectations, but these best practices will provide a framework to attract young individuals with the work ethic and drive to support your organization, while cultivating a younger demographic and stewarding them to fill your pipeline of future leaders and loyal donors.

Check out Katie’s three-part series on Time, Talent and Treasure for more ideas on strengthening your nonprofit’s Boards.

JB+A Own Katie Lord is One of KC’s “Most Wanted”

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Each year, a group of charitable, passionate, hard-working professionals are chosen to be honored by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City as “KC’s Most Wanted.” These honorees are movers and shakers who are making a big difference in their professions and in their community – and JB+A’s very own Vice President Katie Lord is on the list for 2017!

Each year, a group of charitable, passionate, hard-working professionals are chosen to be honored by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City as “KC’s Most Wanted.” These honorees are movers and shakers who are making a big difference in their professions and in their community – -and JB+A’s very own Vice President Katie Lord is on the list for 2017!

“I’m delighted for Katie and this honor, but I’m especially proud of her commitment – personally and professionally — to strengthening our community,” says JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne.  Katie will be recognized with her fellow honorees at the annual Most Wanted Auction on December 2, at Arvest Bank Theater at the Midland. Each honoree will create a unique, one-of-a-kind live auction package, gather silent auction items and raise funds to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City and its mission of creating and supporting life-changing friendships for children.  “Having just had my first child, I understand aspiring to be a role model and friend not only in her life but in the lives of other children. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City allows adults and children to create these special, life-changing relationships,” says Katie. “I’m incredibly honored to be named one of KC’s Most Wanted Honorees.”

From all of us at JB+A, congratulations Katie!

For more information about KC’s Most Wanted, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City and to leave Katie a note of support, visit here. 

JB+A Welcomes New Team Member Eric Tschanz

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Eric Tschanz brings deep expertise in nonprofit management and resource development – demonstrated by his nearly three decades of accomplishments and raising in excess of $30,000,000 as President/Executive Director of Kansas City’s nationally-acclaimed Powell Gardens. His partnership with JB+A spans more than 15 years, and we worked with Eric as fundraising counsel during two capital campaigns at the Gardens. Eric’s fun demeanor, leadership and knowledge of the philanthropic landscape will strengthen our firm’s service to the nonprofit community. I am happy Eric is joining JB+A, and I know our team and our clients will thoroughly enjoy working with him. – Jeffrey D. Byrne, President + CEO

Eric Tschanz, Senior Consultant

Since 1989, Eric Tschanz led Powell Gardens, Inc. as President and Executive Director. As Director Emeritus of Powell Gardens, Eric was recently honored with an Honorary Life Member award from the American Public Gardens Association (APGA).

During Eric’s 29-year career at Powell Gardens he implemented the first two phases of the Gardens’ master plan.  He helped grow the gardens from a staff of 15 to 52, and led the organization in endowment development and major and planned gift capacity building.  In 2008 he completed a $9,000,000 campaign and the construction of the new Heartland Harvest Garden – the largest edible landscape in the country. As the retiring director, he serves as Vice-Chair of the Garden’s $18,500,000 capital/endowment campaign.

Eric completed his B.S. in Horticulture at The Ohio State University and went on to become a Fellow in the Longwood Program at the University of Delaware and Longwood Gardens and graduated in 1977 with a Master’s degree in Botanic Garden Management. He is an Honorary member of the Garden Club of America – Westport Garden Club.  In 2010 Eric was honored by the American Horticultural Society with their 2010 Professional Award and received the APGA’s Award of Merit in 2012.

“After nearly three decades of fundraising in greater Kansas City as President and Executive Director of Powell Gardens, I am delighted to continue serving the philanthropic community – both here at home and beyond – as part of the JB+A team,” shares Eric.

Welcome Eric!

You can reach Eric at 816-237-1999 or at ETschanz@FundraisingJBA.com.

#GivingTuesday Is Right Around the Corner

By | All Posts, Annual Giving, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, News You Can Use, Nonprofit Marketing, Social Media, Technology | No Comments

A little more than a month away, #GivingTuesday falls on November 28th this year. In 2016, #GivingTuesday raised more than $177 million through $1.64 million gifts in 98 countries around the world. Be sure to watch for #GivingTuesday billboards throughout Kansas City: for the sixth year in a row, Lamar Advertising  is collaborating with JB+A to support this global day of giving, by generously providing pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City Metro.

Here are three important steps to take now for a successful #GivingTuesday this fall:

  1. Identify your #GivingTuesday Program/Theme Focus
    Highlight a specific program or immediate need to create your communications talking points and grab donors’ attention. Setting a fundraising goal that is attainable and clearly ties back to what it will help your organization accomplish increases excitement and participation.
  2. Create your #Hashtag
    Identify your unique #hashtag for your #GivingTuesday campaign based on the program or theme you have selected. Be sure to make it short and relevant to your organization and something easy for people to remember.
  3. Alert donors, volunteers and other constituents
    Let folks know via email and your website (and in any already scheduled correspondence) about your #GivingTuesday plans and educate them about the social media channels your organization will be using.  Don’t forget to arm them with your #hashtag.

For more tips about creating a solid #GivingTuesday campaign, download your own “JB+A #GivingTuesday Guide.”

Tax Reform: What’s the Nonprofit Sector Saying?

By | Commentary, Current Events/News, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, Planned Giving | No Comments

Heather Ehlert, Vice President of Client Services

Whether seeking to end the federal estate tax or adopt a universal charitable deduction – both of which are being discussed by the current Administration and Congress – tax reform is tricky.  While it’s difficult to predict the exact impact these changes would have on charitable giving and nonprofits, we can reasonably conclude they would affect our sector. There’s a lot at stake with tax reform, and nonprofit professionals need to stay abreast of these public policy issues.

Our sector is fortunate to have a number of highly competent bodies monitoring situations like this and advocating in support of nonprofits. For example, Dr. Patrick Rooney, Executive Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and a key participant in the research and writing of Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, wrote an article that was recently published on The Conversation.

In his piece, “How closing the door on the estate tax could reduce American giving,” Dr. Rooney illustrates how the estate tax is a significant revenue generator for the U.S. government and the charitable sector – specifically bequests, which accounted for 8% ($30.36 billion) of total giving in the United States in 2016 (according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016.) He provides an analysis of what could happen after a repeal of the “death tax” and notes the fiscal consequences to federal revenue (a reduction by nearly $270 billion within a decade, according to a bipartisan congressional committee) and the estimated ranges of decline in charitable giving (both bequest and non-bequest giving.)

The Congressional Business Office estimated a 6% decline in charitable giving if the estate tax was repealed.  But that analysis was way back in 2004, and a much different scenario exists today.  Other studies estimate a decline of between 12% and 37%, but Dr. Rooney feels these figures probably underestimate the actual effects of a repeal, and walks us through what actually happened in 2010 when the estate tax was temporarily paused to support his hypothesis.  He concludes that if the estate tax was eliminated, giving to charity would be negatively impacted – by reducing giving both during and after donors’ lifetimes. Be sure to check out Dr. Rooney’s full article on The Conversation.

As nonprofit professionals, philanthropic leaders and American citizens it is also our duty (and privilege) to interact with, educate and influence our representatives in government. There are many ways you can advocate for the philanthropic sector. If you’re interested in learning more, check out Jeffrey Byrne’s piece on Advocacy in Philanthropy from the JB+A archives.

Corporate Giving – Are You Tapping This Resource for Your Nonprofit?

By | All Posts, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Giving USA, News You Can Use | No Comments

Katie Lord, Vice President

It’s once again that time of year when our corporate partners/prospects are beginning to look at budgeting and goal-setting for the next fiscal year. It’s also the time of year when we, as nonprofit fundraisers, should be setting up cultivation touch points with this donor segment.  Notice I did not say “annual meetings with our corporate partners.”  As with all of our donors, we should not only be meeting with them to make the “ask,” but to also “take the temperature of the relationship” to further grow the partnership.

According to the Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016, Corporate Giving made up 5% or $18.55 billion of the $390.05 in total giving in the United States last year.  While Corporate Giving is the smallest segment of the sources of giving, there has been an increase in Corporate Giving over the past several years: it is up 3.5% from last year alone.  With Millennials emerging as the largest generation in the workforce, it is important to understand the continual emergence and changing attitudes of the corporate sector on social responsibility.

When approaching a corporate entity, be sure you’ve done your research.  Learn as much as you can about the business, the products/services, who customers are, earnings, etc.  This research can be done by looking at the company’s website, LinkedIn page, local business publications and a quick Google search.  Most importantly, do not go into a meeting with your own pre-conceived notion of what the corporation would want or a “standard” offering or sponsorship menu for them to choose from.  Each corporation or business, just like each individual, is unique – with its own identity, goals and needs.

With the continued evolution of the fundraising and business landscapes, one size no longer fits all when building corporate relationships and donor growth.  There are now multiple ways that nonprofits can benefit from corporate philanthropy, including paid volunteer time for employees, matching gift programs, sponsorship dollars, peer to peer internal fundraising campaigns, cause marketing opportunities and corporate foundations just to name a few.  Be sure to explore all of these possibilities and combinations with your prospective/current corporate partner to ensure the optimum outcome.

Be prepared for your meeting.  Before your meeting, have thoughtful and tailored specific questions, be able to discuss what a charitable partnership looks like and how both parties can measure outcomes and success.  Ask open-ended questions and then LISTEN to the answers.  It is important to be able to articulate how a partnership can be mutually beneficial, by helping the business achieve its goals internally while simultaneously having an impact on your organization and the community externally.

If you are renewing a relationship, be able to illustrate the outcomes of your partnership or projected outcomes.  Include numbers such as digital impressions, value of corporate volunteer time to the organization and what sponsorship dollars were able to achieve.   Also share personal results, quotes from any employees about the impact the partnership had on them or stories of people who directly benefitted from the financial support the corporation provided the organization.

Corporate Giving is a vast resource in our nonprofit communities.  Creativity is important and it is mandatory to think outside the proverbial box in order to meet the changing landscape of corporations, their employees and social responsibility. Gone are the days of offering corporations a set menu of charitable options.  We, as nonprofit professionals, have to be able to entice corporations to build sustainable relationships with the positive outcomes of our partnership.  We have to learn and grow with them by offering innovative ways to contribute to the nonprofit organizations in their communities with their donor dollars, the support of their employees and the positive impact of their contributions in time, talent and treasure.

Welcome Veronica Gerrity, JB+A’s Newest Team Member

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As JB+A continues to grow in response to client needs, I am excited to have Veronica Gerrity join us. Veronica’s passion for service and “can-do” attitude will be a great asset to our fundraising team. I know our clients, the philanthropic community and the rest of our JB+A team will agree she is a valued addition.
– Jeffrey Byrne, President + CEO

Veronica Champion, Coordinator of Administration + Consulting, joined the consulting team at Jeffrey Byrne + Associates with a background in nonprofit coordination and administration. She has worked closely with Board members, clients, families and community organizers.

Prior to her position with JB+A, Veronica was a Care Coordinator at KidsTLC, where she was responsible for all coordination of care for clients, families and mental health providers. A graduate of Ottawa University with a B.A. in Human Services, Veronica is active throughout the community, including Junior League of Kansas City.

“I’m excited to hit the ground running, and to be working with JB+A to help nonprofits continue to make a powerful and much-needed difference in our communities,” says Veronica.  You can reach Veronica at 816.237.1999 or at VGerrity@FundraisingJBA.com.

Welcome Veronica!

Dr. Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Joined us in Kansas City

By | All Posts, Commentary, Events, Fundraising, News You Can Use, Organizational + Personal Development | No Comments

Dr. Pasic spoke to a captive audience at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center on September 14 as part of Nonprofit Connect’s 501(c)Success National Speaker Series.  Dr. Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, shared his expertise and experience in the value of research, and how we can use this valuable tool to improve fundraising and philanthropy.

Dr. Pasic reminded us that essentially, leadership is fundraising, and asked the poignant question, “If a leader isn’t fundraising, is he really a leader?” Dr. Pasic pointed out leadership and fundraising both involve 1) building relationships, 2) engaging, asking and recognizing and 3) creating vision and buy-in. Check out Dr. Pasic’s blog on this very topic.

Key highlights from Dr. Pasic’s presentation included some great examples of people putting research into action:

  • Jane Chu, PhD, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (Rockhurst grad, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy alum and previous director of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts Center) and how she used research to illustrate the impact of the arts and cultural industries on the nation’s gross domestic product.
  • Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, measures the financial scope of philanthropy in the U.S. and is fundamental to fundraising. The seminal report on charitable giving, Giving USA is the longest-running and most comprehensive evaluation of philanthropic trends in the United States. Giving USA is published by the Giving USA Foundation and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Dr. Pasic also pointed out that in addition to utilizing research for evaluation or benchmarking purposes, we can also use research to help identify impact, areas needing funding and other issues in our sector, such as recruiting and retaining talent.

Jeffrey Byrne (JB+A), Dr. Amir Pasic and Lewis Gregory (US Trust)

Dr. Pasic also address some of the “hot topics” in fundraising research now, such as Crowdfunding, Donor-Advised Funds and disaster giving. Crowdfunding is on the rise, and in 2015, $34.44 billion was generated in Crowdfunding, with $2.8 billion of that total raised for formal charitable purposes.

The prevalence of Donor-Advised Funds is increasing as well, both in the number of funds and the total assets held within them:  in 2006, there were 140,000 DAFs holding assets of $33.6 billion.  By 2016, those figures had grown to 269,000 and $78.6 billion respectively.  And in 2015, Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund unseated United Way Worldwide as the largest fundraising charity, having collected $4.6 billion. And three of the Top 10 largest fundraising charities on the list are commercial DAFs: Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, Schwab Charitable Fund and National Christian Foundation. More than half of all DAFs are held in commercial funds and this hot topic is raising questions about their usage: what are the benefits versus the costs to society and the nonprofit sector?  What is the overall impact?  Are DAFS displacing other forms of giving?

The Lilly Family School of Philanthropy has been tracking disaster giving since the attacks of 9/11.  Typically following a disaster, we see a sharp uptick in donations in the first six weeks, with continued moderate growth through six months then finally leveling out.  Celebrities are very prominent in disaster giving (J.J. Watt raised more than $30 million for Hurricane Harvey relief) and the key element in disaster giving is mass participation.  And in times of disaster, we overcome our differences and unite as one force to help those in need.

Dr. Pasic discussed the different types of research:

  • quantitative studies (such as Giving USA, Million Dollar List and The Salvation Army Human Needs Index)
  • experiments (take us away from our “rules of thumb” and comfort zones, but help us discover more effective ways of doing things)
  • humanities (qualitative exploration – such as the Smithsonian Exhibit on Philanthropy (Giving in America is a permanent exhibit that looks at the historical role of philanthropy in shaping the United States)
  • studies of the profession (gender composition of the field, diversity in the field and other issues like compensation and tenure
  • public policy (tax reform, regulations, ethical guidelines for dealing with grateful patients and better educating legislators about our field)

Research asks the questions, in a variety of ways, “Why do things fail? Why do things succeed?”  Bottom line, research helps us cultivate judgement, create communities of discovery and develop leaders – all of which will help us strengthen philanthropy and our world.