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Nonprofit Marketing

#GivingTuesday Is Right Around the Corner

By | All Posts, Annual Giving, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, News You Can Use, Nonprofit Marketing, Social Media, Technology | No Comments

A little more than a month away, #GivingTuesday falls on November 28th this year. In 2016, #GivingTuesday raised more than $177 million through $1.64 million gifts in 98 countries around the world. Be sure to watch for #GivingTuesday billboards throughout Kansas City: for the sixth year in a row, Lamar Advertising  is collaborating with JB+A to support this global day of giving, by generously providing pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City Metro.

Here are three important steps to take now for a successful #GivingTuesday this fall:

  1. Identify your #GivingTuesday Program/Theme Focus
    Highlight a specific program or immediate need to create your communications talking points and grab donors’ attention. Setting a fundraising goal that is attainable and clearly ties back to what it will help your organization accomplish increases excitement and participation.
  2. Create your #Hashtag
    Identify your unique #hashtag for your #GivingTuesday campaign based on the program or theme you have selected. Be sure to make it short and relevant to your organization and something easy for people to remember.
  3. Alert donors, volunteers and other constituents
    Let folks know via email and your website (and in any already scheduled correspondence) about your #GivingTuesday plans and educate them about the social media channels your organization will be using.  Don’t forget to arm them with your #hashtag.

For more tips about creating a solid #GivingTuesday campaign, download your own “JB+A #GivingTuesday Guide.”

Is Your Ask Using the Right Emotional Messages?

By | All Posts, Donor Cultivation, News You Can Use, Nonprofit Marketing, Prospect Research | No Comments

Editor’s Note:  We are pleased to introduce Grant Gooding of Proof Positioning as a guest contributor. Grant cut his teeth in the mergers and acquisitions world which gave him an uncommon, macro understanding of the hard and soft components of businesses and market transition. He took his knowledge of analyzing hundreds of businesses to consult with entrepreneurs, mostly inventors, to help them shape their brands relative to the market landscape. He then took this concept to the next level creating Proof Positioning in 2012 where he integrated consumer insights research into his market based brand process, allowing him to use statistics to show organizations what they can say to close more business.

When making an ask, taking into consideration the different emotional and psychographic idiosyncrasies of your audience can make all the difference.

Although we like to believe we are highly logical beings and use mostly logic when making decisions, neuroscience has debunked this once widely thought presumption and taught us that all our decision making, regardless of its subject and value, resides in our emotional brain.  The money and time that we give to charities and nonprofits is no different.  This being the case, understanding and measuring those emotions is especially important when considering asks to potential and existing donors.

This was evident in a study where our firm was charged with understanding minority population giving motivations for a fund.  We discovered clear trends that allowed our client to make gentle shifts that increased the emotional resonance and engagement of donors.  While there were many takeaways from this study, one simple, yet fascinating discovery was around the different emotionally resonant value propositions of male vs. female donors.  These are some high-level findings and recommendations from that study:

Women:

The data showed very high emotional resonance of three specific value propositions (i) the organization’s reputation (25% higher than men); (ii) the outcomes the organization has achieved (25% higher); and (iii) the transparency of administrative costs (15% higher).  Based on this data we suggested the organization segment its donor database and send separate communications (email, social, event, etc.) to men and women. Some of our recommendations included:

  • Highlight the reputation of the organization by including specific details around outcomes (either stories or statistics) the programs have achieved.  This was the most important thing to women and we recommended including these “micro-stories” into all non-administrative communication to female donors.
  • Be upfront and provide detail around organizational overhead, program costs and money that goes to the people.  They understand these costs exist and will not only appreciate the honesty but sharing this information will actually increase their emotional engagement.

Men:

The data indicated there were three very DIFFERENT value propositions that resonated with men (i) the organization helped other minorities (27% higher than women); (ii) programs increase quality of life in their local community (12% higher); and (iii) programs impact someone I know personally (8% higher).  We made some recommendations based on this data:

  • Start being more outward and explicit about the organization only helping minorities.  This was the most important thing to men, by far, regardless of the program details or the specific outcomes.
  • Use more donor-centric phrases such as “This will impact your neighborhood,” or “This will help someone that you might know.”  This strategy dramatically increased the probability of creating an ambassador out of a male donor.

The fact none of the top three value propositions were coinciding for men and women was not only shocking to us but to the organization as well.  Based on the data, they were able to make simple changes to their communication strategy and their asks to help better align their messages with the things their donors found most important.

While not every organization has dramatic differences between the sexes, variance exists in every donor population because we are emotional, human beings and we all value different things.  If you consider and measure the emotions of your donors and cater your messages to say the right thing to the right people you will have more successful asks and a more engaged donor population.

Grant Gooding holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from William Jewell College/UMKC and an MBA with an emphasis in qualitative marketing from The Bloch School of Business at UMKC. Grant also serves as a Board member to both for-profit and nonprofit organizations, including the UMKC Marketing Advisory Board, is an adviser to several startups and is a frequent lecturer, mentor and judge for the entrepreneur community.  Grant is passionate about educating in the areas of entrepreneurship and brand philosophy. You can reach Grant and Proof Positioning by visiting http://proofpositioning.com/.

I Spy…in the Sky…#GivingTuesday 2015

By | Current Events/News, Fundraising, Insights, JB+A Client Fundraising Success, News You Can Use, Nonprofit Marketing | No Comments

Sandi Grimm
Director of Administration

Lamar Advertising Company is collaborating with JB+A again this year to support #GivingTuesday. Since the inception of #GivingTuesday in 2012, Lamar has generously provided pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City area to promote this global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, Lamar is donating 12 boards over a two week period, for an estimated 3,156,782 viewing impressions.  Lamar has donated 43 billboards over the last four years to help promote #GivingTuesday.picture of GT board 1

Thank you, Lamar Advertising!

This year’s #GivingTuesday is less than two weeks away! (Dec. 1) Every year since its inception, the #GivingTuesday movement has had increasing success:

  • # 30,000+ partners in 68 countries including small businesses, nonprofits, government agencies and major corporations
  • # an estimated 470% increase in online donations on the Tuesday since 2012
  • # 32.7 million twitter impressions
  • # 750,000+ hashtag mentions
  • # 15.4 billion global impressions in print and social media

JB+A encourages all nonprofits to participate in #GivingTuesday, to benefit from great fundraising success when incorporating #GivingTuesday into their year-end fundraising efforts. Make sure your nonprofit benefits from bigger, better and smarter charitable giving this holiday season: click here for tips and tools.

Momentum is building. Anyone, anywhere can get involved in #GivingTuesday. And no matter who you are — individual, family, nonprofit, business — JB+A wants YOU to join the movement: spread the word, support a cause, make a gift, share your story.

For more great ideas on how you can join the movement, click here.

 

YES! Nonprofits Can Hashtag

By | All Posts, Capacity Building, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Insights, News You Can Use, Nonprofit Marketing, Stewardship, Technology | No Comments

Anne Headshot for uploadAnne Corless
Associate Consultant

In last month’s newsletter, we talked about the #GivingTuesday 2015 campaign for your nonprofit.  So, you’ve downloaded the JB+A GivingTuesday_Toolkit_2015 and reviewed all the materials.  “Now what?” you might ask.

Before joining JB+A, I had an amazing opportunity to work in NYC for what has become one of the world’s foremost e-commerce companies. Its incredible success was built through grassroots consumer-driven marketing, especially on social media platforms. By engaging with customers on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and in the blogosphere, the company grew its brand exclusively through peer-to-peer referral via likes, shares, tweets, retweets, video reviews, blogs and reblogs.

From the mouth of Mark Zuckerberg himself, however, “Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission—to make the world more open and connected.”

The #GivingTuesday campaign seeks to capitalize on this idea. As a participating organization, you will become part of the global conversation about philanthropic giving that was continued by more than 15,000 nonprofits and 20,000 partner organizations last year, and which translated into more than $100 million in total gifts. Tapping into this energy, you will be able to expand your audience by increasing awareness for your mission, you will improve conversation about your cause by connecting with your audience in a meaningful way, and hopefully, you will be able to inspire your community to action.

Connect.
The best way to make new friends is through old friends.

Think of a blind date:  would you be more likely to sit down to dinner with a stranger if along with flowers and a nice head of hair, he came with a gushing recommendation from your best friend? Probably. Similarly, an introduction or solicitation from your organization will be better received if it is made with the endorsement of a mutual friend.

Social media channels empower businesses and organizations to make these personal connections. Your organization can capitalize on the established social networks of Board members, staff, volunteers and avid supporters of your cause. This is totally free promotional space that has the additional benefit of personal endorsement.

Reach out to your supporters and ask them to like, share and tweet your message. As follow up, like, retweet and respond to all posts and comments from your organization’s page – you can even like your own posts from your personal accounts. On Facebook, these interactive touches have the additional benefit of generating ticker stories that will show updates in real-time not only to people in your immediate network, but to friends of friends as well.

Message.
Engage in a two-way conversation.

Cramming your organization’s mission statement, future goals, past achievements, current projects and a call to action into 140 characters is a daunting task.  Actually, it’s an impossible one. Instead of a one-shot solicitation attempt, approach your #GivingTuesday campaign as beginning a conversation.

Speak with one voice. Decide on a tone and tenor to interact with your audience, and make sure that verbiage and formatting are consistent across platforms. Engage your audience by using a conversational tone – use appropriate jargon, but simplify your message so that it is accessible.

Provide speaking points, suggested captions and tweets. Arm your staff and volunteers with examples of appropriate and effective messages to share on #GivingTuesday.

“It’s #GivingTuesday, and I am donating to @ _____ because_________.”

“I’m gifting the money I saved during #BlackFriday to @______. I hope you’ll join me in supporting a worthy cause on #GivingTuesday.”

“The work we do @_________ is very near and dear to my <3. Show your support on #GivingTuesday and #savealife”

Increase your message’s visibility by using the #GivingTuesday hashtag across all platforms; this will link your post to Twitter’s Trending Topics feed, where it can be seen alongside posts from other participating organizations. Make your messages stand out by creating your own unique hashtag!

Image.Thirst Water #GivingTuesday tweet
A picture is worth a thousand words.

Attention is most easily captivated by visual content. In fact, posts that include pictures or some graphic element see greater engagement than text-based posts – producing an up to 85% interaction rate on Facebook and an increase in retweets by 35%.

Heifer International #GivingTuesdayCreate an image or info graphic that helps your audience quickly understand your organization’s mission and impact in the community – use charts and statistics to illustrate the issues at hand, how your organization is addressing them and the success you have had in a visually interesting way.

To make #GivingTuesday posts even more personal, encourage your supporters to post an #UNselfie – or “unselfish selfie”—to tell why they are donating to your cause.  Even encourage staff to take behind-the-scenes pictures of your #GivingTuesday activities (make sure to tag everyone!) This is a fun, interactive way to extend the reach of your message to untapped networks with a personal touch.

So, when you carry out your organization’s #GivingTuesday campaign, remember the key takeaways:

  • Use #GivingTuesday to open your audience’s eyes to the need for your organization.
  • Show them the work that you do.
  • Invite discussion.
  • Explain why you need their help.
  • Call them to rally to your cause.
  • Imagine for them the change you can achieve together.
  • Ask them to be an advocate.
  • Say thank you.
  • And say thank you again.

givingtuesday-unselfie