Insights + News + Updates

Join us on September 19 for Bob Woodson and Panel Forum

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Join JB+A and AFP Mid-America Chapter on September 19 as we open up a special Forum to the entire Kansas City philanthropic community. (Event details below.) We’re inviting civic leaders, leaders of faith communities and all those interested in exploring new directions in philanthropy and activism.
Venture Philanthropy: Bob Woodson will address issues raised in his book, Triumphs of Joseph: How Today’s Community Healers Are Reviving Our Streets and Neighborhoods.  During this lively discussion, Bob will describe his approach to empower faith organizations and local leadership to transform the struggling neighborhoods in which they live from the inside out. Discover how his organization helps residents of underserved neighborhoods identify their own strengths and capacities to effectively address the problems in their communities and how public/private partnerships can be a powerful tool in these efforts.
Following Bob’s presentation, a panel of local experts will continue the discussion with their experiences in Kansas City, and how we can adapt Bob’s lessons for our local use.

William (Bill) High is the Chief Executive Officer of National Christian Foundation Heartland. At NCF, he works with families, individual givers and financial advisors to inspire and facilitate biblical generosity. Practically, he works with families to develop multi-generational plans, address income tax, estate tax and complex gift transactions, including the sales of businesses. Bill is a recognized speaker, including recognition as one of the Top 25 Philanthropy Speakers in the country by Philanthropy Media.. He speaks frequently at conferences around the country.

Bill is the founder of iDonate.com, a donation platform software company serving the non-profit community. He also helped found FamilyArc.com, a family legacy company committed to helping families preserve their stories online. As the President of Ignite Consulting, Bill works with families to design their multi-generational legacy plans.

As a published author, Bill recently co-authored with David Green of Hobby Lobby, Giving it All Away and Getting it All Back Again: The Way of Living Generously (Zondervan 2017).
Pat Macdonald joins us in her role as Executive Director of the Black Community Fund, an Affiliate of the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation where she serves dually as a Senior Philanthropic Advisor.

Pat joined the Community Foundation in 2006 but has a long history in nonprofit management, strategic planning, resource and community development, and the arts. In the mid 90’s Pat spent 9 years with BEU a Community Development Corporation, in the Historic 18th and Vine district. While there, she represented Kansas City as one of eight individuals selected nationally to participate in the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild’s Community Development Arts Resource Initiative at Harvard Graduate School of Business.  In the early 2000’s Pat enjoyed independent consulting as a museum design content researcher for Eisterhold Associates. With Eisterhold, Pat contributed to such projects as the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in North Carolina, Rosa Parks Children’s Annex in Alabama and Ralph Nader’s Tort Law Museum in Connecticut. Ever committed to applying personally and professionally acquired skills toward improving the quality of life in Kansas City, she has served on a number of boards affecting both sides of Kansas City’s state line and is currently on the Board of Trustees of City Trusts for the City of Kansas City, Missouri, KCUR, VisitKC, and Rotary Club 13.

Pat is a past President of the Mid-America Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and attained CFRE credentials in the field.

Desiree Monize is the founder and Executive Director of Avenue of Life, a nonprofit with the aim of breaking the cycle of poverty through community development in KCK and KCMO.   For six years, Desiree served as the Executive Director of Hope Faith Ministries, where she took a small soup kitchen to the largest homeless day center in Kansas City.

Prior to working with the homeless, Desiree held the position of Equipping Pastor at Vineyard KC North, serving a congregation of 2000 through volunteer management, assimilation, leadership development and pastoral care.

Desiree has over 17 years experience in the field of domestic violence, serving as a legal advocate and shelter liaison. She is a visionary leader with a talent for rebuilding inefficient businesses with the effective leadership, policies and procedures needed for healthy growth and expansion.  She is passionately committed to urban ministry and community development.

She is a mother to two sons and a daughter-in-law.  She recently became a grandmother to identical twin boys who are 15 months old.  Desiree currently lives in Kansas City, Kansas.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Bob Woodson Presentation 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Panel Discussion 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Kauffman Foundation Conference Center
4801 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110

Register here.

Join JB+A and AFP Mid-America Chapter for Bob Woodson on September 19

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Robert L. Woodson, Sr. founded the Woodson Center in 1981 to help residents of low-income neighborhoods address the problems of their communities. A former civil rights activist, he had headed the National Urban League Department of Criminal Justice and has been a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Foundation for Public Policy Research.

Join the AFP Mid-America Chapter for a special forum with Bob Woodson, where he will address issues raised in his book, Triumphs of Joseph: How Today’s Community Healers Are Reviving Our Streets and Neighborhoods.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Bob Woodson Presentation 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Panel Discussion 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Kauffman Foundation Conference Center
4801 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110

Register here.

During a lively discussion, Bob will describe his approach to empower faith organizations and local leadership to transform the struggling neighborhoods in which they live from the inside out. Discover how his organization helps residents of underserved neighborhoods identify their own strengths and capacities to effectively address the problems in their communities and how public/private partnerships can be a powerful tool in these efforts.

Referred to by many as the “godfather” of the neighborhood empowerment movement, for more than four decades, Woodson has had a special concern fro the problems of youth. He is an early MacArthur “genius” awardee and the recipient of the 2008 Bradley Prize, the Presidential Citizens Award and a 2008 Social Entrepreneurship Award from the Manhattan Institute.

JB+A Client Partner Mattie Rhodes Center Awarded Missouri Neighborhood Assistance Program Tax Credits

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Mattie Rhodes Center (MRC) enriches the lives of individuals, families and communities in a respectful, multi-cultural environment. Since its inception more than 120 years ago, MRC’s call to community service has been to champion the needs of others. Today, its community service calls for them to campaign for the continued evolution of cultural arts as a tool for education and unification.

MRC identified the need to expand service space and decrease costs within the cultural arts area of the agency, which is based out of the Westside neighborhood of Kansas City, Missouri. It acquired land to build a new Cultural Center and JB+A helped it begin its EXPLORE. LEARN. CREATE. BELONG. Campaign to raise funds for constructing the new Center. Part of its fundraising plan included applying for tax credits from the Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP).  This program provides assistance to community-based organizations that enables them to implement community or neighborhood projects in the areas of community service, education, crime prevention, job training and physical revitalization. The Department of Economic Development will issue 50% or 70% tax credits to an eligible taxpayer who makes a qualified contribution to an approved NAP project.  MRC was notified by the Missouri DED in late August it was awarded $200,000 in NAP tax credits to utilize in raising funds for its new Cultural Center.  The $200,000 in 50% tax credits can generate $400,000 in contributions to the MRC campaign for its new Cultural Center. Congratulations Mattie Rhodes Center!

The new Mattie Rhodes Cultural Center will be a safe and welcoming environment that will supplement its other facilities. The building will be anchored by four pillars: 1) educational programs, 2) gallery/exhibit space, 3) cultural exchange and 4) event/gathering space. The new Center will be an energy-efficient building that is artistically and culturally appropriate and inviting for the neighborhood. The facility will be constructed to accommodate flexible, multi-functional exhibition and classroom space. Off-street and handicap-accessible parking will be provided. The new Cultural Center will provide a permanent home for Kansas City’s only collection of international folk art – the Hand-In-Hand Folk Art Collection, gallery space, open classrooms, community event space, gift and retail space.

Learn more about MRC and its new Cultural Center here.

To learn more about the Missouri DED NAP tax credits and eligibility criteria for donors, visit here.

 

 

Leadership is Fundraising, Says the Philanthropy Professor

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JB+A is pleased to share this blog from Dr. Amir Pasic, our friend and colleague.  Dr. Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, joined us in Kansas City on September 14 for a special presentation on the value of research and how it informs leadership and fundraising success.

I like to praise the virtues of excellent fundraising in pursuit of a great mission conducted ethically by leaders of exemplary integrity. Seasoned fundraisers, wherever they sit within an organization or in its supporting environment, understand the virtuous cycle that appears with a successful fundraising program. There is focus on strategic priorities, buy-in from inside the organization and throughout the community of supporters, clear plans for interacting with donors and friends across all segments and phases of engagement, and there is celebration of the people who provide the resources that enable progress in pursuit of the organization’s vital vision.

I often wonder if leadership that does not emulate the process of fundraising even makes sense. When does a leader not ask others to do things differently, or to stop doing certain things, or to let go of possessions or practices, which they then do willingly and happily? And not only do I like to think of leadership and fundraising as synonyms in many ways, but as fundraising practitioners well know, your title or your position does not necessarily reflect your ability to succeed. Indeed, virtuosos of leadership and fundraising manage to make a difference regardless of their official position.

In such challenging and often ambiguous situations how does one grasp what to focus on and decide where to direct one’s activity? One key resource that any leader needs is research. How do we know what works, and just as importantly, what does not? How can we understand the complexity of what motivates a donor? How can we assess the impact of our efforts? And, in the bigger picture, how can we hope to address societal problems or develop effective strategies unless we have reliable insight into new developments in our field and into the patterns and trends that help us understand the ever-changing context within which we work. Rigorous, high quality research is an important component in virtually all aspects of the work of philanthropy, and it is through better research that we will achieve even better results.

Check out a recap of Dr. Pasic’s presentation in Kansas City.

Dr. Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Joined us in Kansas City

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Dr. Pasic spoke to a captive audience at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center on September 14 as part of Nonprofit Connect’s 501(c)Success National Speaker Series.  Dr. Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, shared his expertise and experience in the value of research, and how we can use this valuable tool to improve fundraising and philanthropy.

Dr. Pasic reminded us that essentially, leadership is fundraising, and asked the poignant question, “If a leader isn’t fundraising, is he really a leader?” Dr. Pasic pointed out leadership and fundraising both involve 1) building relationships, 2) engaging, asking and recognizing and 3) creating vision and buy-in. Check out Dr. Pasic’s blog on this very topic.

Key highlights from Dr. Pasic’s presentation included some great examples of people putting research into action:

  • Jane Chu, PhD, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (Rockhurst grad, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy alum and previous director of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts Center) and how she used research to illustrate the impact of the arts and cultural industries on the nation’s gross domestic product.
  • Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, measures the financial scope of philanthropy in the U.S. and is fundamental to fundraising. The seminal report on charitable giving, Giving USA is the longest-running and most comprehensive evaluation of philanthropic trends in the United States. Giving USA is published by the Giving USA Foundation and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Dr. Pasic also pointed out that in addition to utilizing research for evaluation or benchmarking purposes, we can also use research to help identify impact, areas needing funding and other issues in our sector, such as recruiting and retaining talent.

Jeffrey Byrne (JB+A), Dr. Amir Pasic and Lewis Gregory (US Trust)

Dr. Pasic also address some of the “hot topics” in fundraising research now, such as Crowdfunding, Donor-Advised Funds and disaster giving. Crowdfunding is on the rise, and in 2015, $34.44 billion was generated in Crowdfunding, with $2.8 billion of that total raised for formal charitable purposes.

The prevalence of Donor-Advised Funds is increasing as well, both in the number of funds and the total assets held within them:  in 2006, there were 140,000 DAFs holding assets of $33.6 billion.  By 2016, those figures had grown to 269,000 and $78.6 billion respectively.  And in 2015, Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund unseated United Way Worldwide as the largest fundraising charity, having collected $4.6 billion. And three of the Top 10 largest fundraising charities on the list are commercial DAFs: Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, Schwab Charitable Fund and National Christian Foundation. More than half of all DAFs are held in commercial funds and this hot topic is raising questions about their usage: what are the benefits versus the costs to society and the nonprofit sector?  What is the overall impact?  Are DAFS displacing other forms of giving?

The Lilly Family School of Philanthropy has been tracking disaster giving since the attacks of 9/11.  Typically following a disaster, we see a sharp uptick in donations in the first six weeks, with continued moderate growth through six months then finally leveling out.  Celebrities are very prominent in disaster giving (J.J. Watt raised more than $30 million for Hurricane Harvey relief) and the key element in disaster giving is mass participation.  And in times of disaster, we overcome our differences and unite as one force to help those in need.

Dr. Pasic discussed the different types of research:

  • quantitative studies (such as Giving USA, Million Dollar List and The Salvation Army Human Needs Index)
  • experiments (take us away from our “rules of thumb” and comfort zones, but help us discover more effective ways of doing things)
  • humanities (qualitative exploration – such as the Smithsonian Exhibit on Philanthropy (Giving in America is a permanent exhibit that looks at the historical role of philanthropy in shaping the United States)
  • studies of the profession (gender composition of the field, diversity in the field and other issues like compensation and tenure
  • public policy (tax reform, regulations, ethical guidelines for dealing with grateful patients and better educating legislators about our field)

Research asks the questions, in a variety of ways, “Why do things fail? Why do things succeed?”  Bottom line, research helps us cultivate judgement, create communities of discovery and develop leaders – all of which will help us strengthen philanthropy and our world.

Join JB+A, U.S. Trust and Nonprofit Connect for Dr. Amir Pasic on Thursday, September 14

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Dr. Amir Pasic is the Eugene R. Tempel Dean and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Pasic leads the world’s first school devoted to the study and teaching of philanthropy.

The school is an internationally recognized leader in philanthropy education, research and training and is dedicated to improving philanthropy to benefit the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change.

Dr. Pasic will address how an organization’s leadership and fundraising staff must be focused on the same things to make fundraising efforts successful. How do leaders and fundraising practitioners grasp what to focus on and decide where to direct their activity? One key resource that any leader needs is research:

  • How do we know what works, and just as importantly, what does not?
  • How can we understand the complexity of what motivates a donor?
  • How can we assess the impact of our efforts?
  • How can we hope to address societal problems or develop effective strategies unless we have reliable insight into new developments in our field?

Rigorous, high-quality research is an important component in virtually all aspects of the work of philanthropy, and it is through better research that we will achieve even better results.  Join us to meet Dr. Pasic and discuss how research can inform success.

Reserve your spot and register here.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

7:30 – 9:00 a.m.
7:30 a.m. – Breakfast | 7:55 a.m. – Program
Kauffman Foundation Conference Center
4801 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110
JB+A is a proud sponsor of the 2017 501(c)Success National Speaker Series,
a program of Nonprofit Connect
501(c) Success National Speaker Series

Do Your Homework, Sit Still and LISTEN

By | All Posts, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Major Gift Solicitation, News You Can Use, Organizational + Personal Development, Prospect Research, Volunteers | No Comments

Jeffrey D. Byrne, President + CEO

We know to do our homework on prospective donors. You’ve heard me say time and again “Don’t commit fundraising malpractice!” (See my blog piece on the benefits of prospect research here.)That means do your research – because it reveals information about the wealth and capacity of prospects as well as information about philanthropic giving history, community involvement, natural partners and connections. And your donor database should contain important notes about your prospects and interactions with them. Prepare for your visit.

Sitting still tells your audience you really care about what they should say. Don’t shuffle your papers. Don’t check your phone. Don’t fidget. Sitting still lets you hear what your prospective donor should tell you about their life story and experiences – maybe even how a single instance changed their life. You can learn why they are passionate about your organization and its mission.

I believe in order to be a great fundraiser, you have to be a good – if not great – listener. Human nature might urge you to fill quiet moments with a remark or an anecdote. Of course you are nervous, and anxious to impress. You certainly want to make a connection you can build upon later. But it is in those quiet moments that you, as a volunteer or professional, can learn the most.  Waiting for the prospective donor to share might result in hearing firsthand how your healthcare institution saved their life. You might learn a relative was a long-time volunteer. You might learn how an agency similar to yours provided their mother with safety and refuge from domestic violence.  Resist the urge to talk about yourself.  Ask prospective donors about themselves…and then listen to what they say. Some good lead-ins might include:

  • “Tell me more about that …”
  • “What did she/he say about that…?”
  • “What happened next …?”
  • “What made you decide to …?”

You get the idea. You can think up your own list of “conversation engagers” that will help you get to know your prospective donor and involve them in the meeting. The bottom line is this: regardless of with whom you are meeting, when you get your prospective donors talking about themselves – when you ask about them – your prospective donor will come away from the visit feeling much more satisfied and positive about you and your organization than if you had used the time trying to tell them the 50 wonderful things you are doing to make a difference.

However, all of this doesn’t mean you should not educate your listeners about your organization and your mission. I’d suggest you use the 80/20 rule. Inform 20 percent of the time and LISTEN the other 80 percent.

In training staff and volunteers to make major gift solicitations, we place considerable emphasis on setting the appointment, sharing the vision and asking for the gift. Think about all the times we practice the script for the call or role-play the visit.  But how often do we practice listening? If you have volunteers who are reluctant to go on solicitation calls, think about how can coaching them on listening style can help them overcome their jitters about making the “ask.”

And finally, care about what’s being said and commit it to memory. Make notes when you leave if you need to capture details. This kind of active listening and remembering stems from truly caring about the donor. Don’t let the lure of a gift keep you from truly caring and listening to the prospective donor’s words. If you are listening and caring (and, of course, remembering to ask for the gift,) the gift will come.

Is Your Ask Using the Right Emotional Messages?

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Editor’s Note:  We are pleased to introduce Grant Gooding of Proof Positioning as a guest contributor. Grant cut his teeth in the mergers and acquisitions world which gave him an uncommon, macro understanding of the hard and soft components of businesses and market transition. He took his knowledge of analyzing hundreds of businesses to consult with entrepreneurs, mostly inventors, to help them shape their brands relative to the market landscape. He then took this concept to the next level creating Proof Positioning in 2012 where he integrated consumer insights research into his market based brand process, allowing him to use statistics to show organizations what they can say to close more business.

When making an ask, taking into consideration the different emotional and psychographic idiosyncrasies of your audience can make all the difference.

Although we like to believe we are highly logical beings and use mostly logic when making decisions, neuroscience has debunked this once widely thought presumption and taught us that all our decision making, regardless of its subject and value, resides in our emotional brain.  The money and time that we give to charities and nonprofits is no different.  This being the case, understanding and measuring those emotions is especially important when considering asks to potential and existing donors.

This was evident in a study where our firm was charged with understanding minority population giving motivations for a fund.  We discovered clear trends that allowed our client to make gentle shifts that increased the emotional resonance and engagement of donors.  While there were many takeaways from this study, one simple, yet fascinating discovery was around the different emotionally resonant value propositions of male vs. female donors.  These are some high-level findings and recommendations from that study:

Women:

The data showed very high emotional resonance of three specific value propositions (i) the organization’s reputation (25% higher than men); (ii) the outcomes the organization has achieved (25% higher); and (iii) the transparency of administrative costs (15% higher).  Based on this data we suggested the organization segment its donor database and send separate communications (email, social, event, etc.) to men and women. Some of our recommendations included:

  • Highlight the reputation of the organization by including specific details around outcomes (either stories or statistics) the programs have achieved.  This was the most important thing to women and we recommended including these “micro-stories” into all non-administrative communication to female donors.
  • Be upfront and provide detail around organizational overhead, program costs and money that goes to the people.  They understand these costs exist and will not only appreciate the honesty but sharing this information will actually increase their emotional engagement.

Men:

The data indicated there were three very DIFFERENT value propositions that resonated with men (i) the organization helped other minorities (27% higher than women); (ii) programs increase quality of life in their local community (12% higher); and (iii) programs impact someone I know personally (8% higher).  We made some recommendations based on this data:

  • Start being more outward and explicit about the organization only helping minorities.  This was the most important thing to men, by far, regardless of the program details or the specific outcomes.
  • Use more donor-centric phrases such as “This will impact your neighborhood,” or “This will help someone that you might know.”  This strategy dramatically increased the probability of creating an ambassador out of a male donor.

The fact none of the top three value propositions were coinciding for men and women was not only shocking to us but to the organization as well.  Based on the data, they were able to make simple changes to their communication strategy and their asks to help better align their messages with the things their donors found most important.

While not every organization has dramatic differences between the sexes, variance exists in every donor population because we are emotional, human beings and we all value different things.  If you consider and measure the emotions of your donors and cater your messages to say the right thing to the right people you will have more successful asks and a more engaged donor population.

Grant Gooding holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from William Jewell College/UMKC and an MBA with an emphasis in qualitative marketing from The Bloch School of Business at UMKC. Grant also serves as a Board member to both for-profit and nonprofit organizations, including the UMKC Marketing Advisory Board, is an adviser to several startups and is a frequent lecturer, mentor and judge for the entrepreneur community.  Grant is passionate about educating in the areas of entrepreneurship and brand philosophy. You can reach Grant and Proof Positioning by visiting http://proofpositioning.com/.

Summer + Planning = #GivingTuesday Fundraising Success

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Katie Lord, Vice President

It’s officially summer and you know what that means: “special summer deal” ads are bombarding us on TV and reminders that it’s time to start thinking about the year-end holidays are already starting to pop up on social media.  As consumers, we either love or loathe these very early reminders of the impending holiday season; for nonprofits, it is a reminder we need to begin thinking about something else associated with the holiday time of year: #GivingTuesday.

Celebrating its 5th anniversary, #GivingTuesday falls on November 28th this year. In 2016, #GivingTuesday raised more than $177 million through $1.64 million gifts in 98 countries around the world. November may seem like a long way away with countless other deadlines in between for you and your organization, but there are three important steps you can take now to get a jumpstart on a successful #GivingTuesday this fall:

  1. Identify your #GivingTuesday Program Focus

When crafting a #GivingTuesday campaign, it is best to highlight a specific program or immediate need with in your organization to grab donors’ attention. Granted, we all need general operational support, but your annual appeal supports that. Since social media is the main vehicle for #GivingTuesday, your #GivingTuesday campaigns need to be targeted and more specific, enabling the goal of the day to be reached through viral sharing and support of your followers and donors.  Examples include a special project in your facility or purchase of technology or supplies.

  1. Find a Matching Gift

It’s been shown that #GivingTuesday and year-end appeals with matching funds have better results.  Now is the time to look through your donor database and current major gift relationships to identify, cultivate and solicit a short list of prospects for matching funds to your #GivingTuesday project and goals.

  1. Create your #Hashtag

It is not too early to create your unique #hashtag for your #GivingTuesday campaign based on the program or theme you have selected. Be sure to make it short and relevant to your organization and something easy for people to remember.  Not only will this allow you to stand out on the actual day by having a unique hashtag, it also provides increased opportunity for your specific campaign to “trend.”

It is not too early to start “pre-sharing” your plans for #GivingTuesday, and building the anticipation and excitement that will keep your organization’s campaign top of mind for donors, volunteers and staff who will be involved in planning and executing a successful #GivingTuesday.

For more tips about creating a solid #GivingTuesday campaign, download your own “JB+A #GivingTuesday Guide.”

And a special thank you to Dave Halpin and Lamar Advertising for donating several billboards promoting #GivingTuesday around greater Kansas City.

Safehouse Crisis Center Celebrates New Center

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Jeffrey Byrne + Associates proudly partnered with Safehouse Crisis Center for a successful $1.2 million campaign to build a new center in Pittsburg, Kansas.

From left to right: Ron Scripsick, Jeannette Minnis, Susie Boldrini, Rebecca Brubaker and John Marshall.

On June 29, Safehouse Crisis Center celebrated the opening of its new center in Pittsburg, Kansas, and recognized the army of volunteers and donors of the “Building New Opportunities” campaign who were responsible for raising $1,200,000 for the new building.

Safehouse, started in 1979, serves seven counties in southeast Kansas, offering safety and advocacy services for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Clients can stay for a maximum of 90 days with the opportunity to benefit from transitional housing as needed.

The new shelter is nearly double the size of the previous shelter, providing much needed relief. It offers larger bedrooms and bathrooms, comfortable community rooms and modern kitchens for clients to utilize in preparing their own meals. The shelter will also offer services to men who are victims of domestic violence.

The “Building New Opportunities” campaign was launched following the conclusion of a Feasibility Study conducted by Jeffrey Byrne + Associates. “After learning from our consultant that conducting a campaign was indeed feasible, we knew right away that we needed to recruit dynamic leadership,” states Safehouse Executive Director Rebecca Brubaker. “We approached two long-time friends and prominent leaders within Pittsburg:  Susie Boldrini and Jeannette Minnis, and they were quick to sign on as campaign co-chairs. What soon transpired was way, way beyond our expectations.”

JB+A  campaign consultant John Marshall recalls “Rebecca and I sat down with Susie and Jeannette to discuss the campaign during which I suggested that it could take up to a year to raise the funds needed. Susie looked at Jeannette and then back at me and said, ‘We can get this done a lot quicker than that!’ ‘Hmmmnnn’ I remember thinking. However, after that, it became clear to me that they were truly a dynamic-duo.”

Once the campaign committee had been formed, they put forth an incredible effort, and reached their goal IN ONE MONTH! It was nothing short of spectacular and as John Marshall stated, “It was unlike any campaign I had ever been involved in before – simply amazing.”

At the victory celebration, co-chair Susie Boldrini graciously thanked everyone for their efforts and generosity. She closed with, “Once again, the Pittsburg community responded beautifully in supporting this tremendously important need. Raising $1.2 million in such a short period of time was a real testament to the compassion that exists within our caring community.”

JB+A was privileged to partner with the staff and volunteers at Safehouse in an effort which will have a profound and lasting impact on those who receive its crucial services.