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Heather Ehlert

Director of Development Opportunities with JB+A Client Covenant Retirement Communities

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JB+A Client Covenant Retirement Communities is a faith-based organization providing retirement housing and senior care. From the establishment of its first community – Covenant Home of Chicago in 1886 – to becoming the fifth-largest not-for-profit Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) sponsor in the LeadingAge Ziegler Top 150, its goal has been to provide outstanding care and services to senior adults.

A ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church, Covenant Retirement Communities is headquartered in suburban Chicago and operates 12 Continuing Care Retirement Communities across the U.S. Each community offers a comfortably independent and active lifestyle, creating joy and peace of mind for residents and their families by providing a better way of life.

Covenant Retirement Communities’ 12 CCRC communities are:

  • Covenant Shores (Mercer Island, WA)
  • Covenant Village of Colorado (Westminster, CO)
  • Covenant Village of Cromwell (Cromwell, CT)
  • Covenant Village of Florida (Plantation, FL)
  • Covenant Village of Golden Valley (Golden Valley, MN)
  • Covenant Village of the Great Lakes (Grand Rapids, MI)
  • Covenant Village of Northbrook (Northbrook, Ill)
  • Covenant Village of Turlock (Turlock, CA)
  • The Holmstad (Batavia, Ill)
  • Mount Miguel Covenant Village (Spring Valley, CA)
  • The Samarkand (Santa Barbara, CA)
  • Windsor Park (Carol Stream, Ill)

Strengthening the Mission of Covenant Retirement Communities through Enhanced Fundraising

Covenant Retirement Communities is taking steps to ensure it is prepared to meet the needs of a growing senior population.  It is currently developing a plan to grow its resources to support a significantly larger Benevolent Care endowment fund, programs and special capital projects. A historic fundraising effort seeking contributions from a variety of donors will help provide the reassurance current and future residents need to live in an environment of grace and peace.

Covenant Retirement Communities is searching for qualified fundraising professionals to serve as Directors of Development in three of its communities:

Background

The Director of Development (DOD) works with the Executive Director to develop and manage a comprehensive fundraising program on the campus. This position has the responsibility to secure philanthropic support through annual gifts, major gifts and legacy gifts with an aggressive focus on outright major gifts from non-resident sources to support the campus benevolent care program needs. The DOD is responsible for the planning, administration and implementation of development goals, objectives and initiatives of the community.

Responsibilities

This position respectfully interacts with and maintains positive relationships, with residents, resident family members, visitors and employees, practicing honesty and integrity in all aspects of job performance. In performance of duties, the Director of Development is entrusted with the following responsibilities:

  • Develop and execute an annual campus fundraising plan (including specific metrics for funds raised and other goals to be achieved).
  • Secure financial support from a portfolio of residents, families, and other individuals as well as vendors, churches and other organizations.
  • Develop, maintain, and track ongoing relationships with major donors.
  • Create and execute the strategy for growing a sustained base of annual fund individual donors (residents, families and other individuals).
  • Monitor and evaluate all fundraising activities to ensure that the fundraising goals are being achieved (including: total dollars raised, total dollars solicited, number of asks made, and number of gifts received).
  • Develop and manage timelines for various fundraising activities to ensure strategic plans and critical fundraising processes are carried out in a timely manner.
  • Develop and manage the donor recognition program including events, the donor recognition wall and donor lists.
  • Oversee the campus fundraising database coordinator to make sure gift entry and acknowledgment is done on a timely basis and ensure that donor/prospect profile information is current and accurate.
  • Perform other related responsibilities as assigned.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s Degree.
  • 5-7 years of relationship-building fundraising experience with an emphasis on personal solicitation of annual, major and planned gifts.
  • Demonstrated comfort and experience with identifying, cultivating, closing, and stewarding significant gifts ($20,000+).
  • Demonstrated experience collaborating with site leadership in developing fundraising strategies and plans/metrics to meet fundraising goals.
  • Strong relationship management.
  • A commitment to the mission and values of Covenant Retirement Communities as a faith-based organization.

Application Instructions

For consideration, candidates should submit a cover letter, resume and three professional references. Your cover letter should articulate your experience and qualifications for the position. Please send materials to: CRCExecSearch@FundraisingJBA.com and put the name of the community in which you are interested in the subject line.

Covenant Retirement Communities believes it is a great place to work. Covenant Retirement Communities believes its employees are inspired to serve. Covenant Retirement Communities believes in making a difference in other’s lives. Covenant Retirement Communities has approximately 3,200 employees serving more than 5,000 residents in its nationwide family of continuing care retirement communities and home health. Construction and development continue on several of its campuses, ensuring ever more exciting opportunities for employees to serve residents.

For full time employees, CRC offers a generous benefits package that includes medical, dental and vision insurance; employer paid group term life and disability, Paid Time Off (PTO) and six paid holidays; a 403(b) with a 3% employer match and other various voluntary benefits such as Life, AD&D; tuition assistance and scholarships; employee assistance program; legal services, home/auto insurance, discount purchasing program; pet insurance and fitness center use at most facilities.

Covenant Retirement Communities is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, disability, marital status, pregnancy, protected veteran status, protected genetic information, or any other characteristics protected by local laws, regulations, or ordinances.

Join JB+A and Nonprofit Connect for Anne Wallestad and 501(c)Success on April 26

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Anne Wallestad
President and CEO BoardSource

Recognizing the critical partnership between boards and executives, and the impact of that partnership on overall organizational success, BoardSource helps nonprofit leaders invest in their leadership partnership by providing research, thought leadership and practical supports that help transform board structures, dynamics and perspectives.

Check out Anne’s thoughts on the power of boards in “Don’t Just Sit on a Board: Stand for Your Mission” from Huffington Post.

Anne was appointed to her position in 2013, after having served on BoardSource’s leadership team for nearly five years. She has overseen a period of remarkable growth and change, helping BoardSource expand its leadership voice and build a scalable model of program delivery that has resulted in a more than 200 percent growth in the number of leaders served. She has played an instrumental role in the launch of several new leadership initiatives including the Stand for Your Mission campaign, which challenges board leaders to play a stronger role in advocacy and public policy.

With 20 years of executive leadership experience in the nonprofit sector, Anne has worked closely with boards of directors and volunteers in a number of national and local organizations and has cultivated deep expertise in fundraising strategy and leveraging the board’s fundraising role. She has served on a number of advisory committees and panels, including the Commission on Accountability and Policy for Religious Organizations Panel on the Nonprofit Sector and Independent Sector’s 2014 Ethics & Accountability Advisory Committee. Under her leadership, BoardSource has been recognized as a finalist for the prestigious Drucker Prize for innovation and named a Best Nonprofit to Work For in 2016 and 2017. Anne herself has been honored as one of The Nonprofit Times’ “Power & Influence Top 50.”

Anne graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Drake University, with degrees in both sociology and English. She is also a graduate of Stanford University Graduate School of Business’ Executive Program for Nonprofit Leaders.

Be sure to register for the first 501(c) Success Series program of 2018 featuring Anne Wallestad, President & CEO of BoardSource, a globally recognized organization focused on strengthening nonprofit board and executive leadership.

Thursday, April 26, 2018
7:30 – 9:00 AM
7:30 AM – Continental breakfast served
7:55 AM – Program starts

Kauffman Foundation Conference Center
4801 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110

Fees/Admission
$25 – Nonprofit Connect members
$50 – Nonmembers
(A light breakfast will be served.)

Donor-Advised Funds: Stronger than Ever

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Heather Ehlert
Vice President of Client Services

As fundraisers and nonprofit managers, we know donor-advised funds (DAFs) have become a very popular – albeit somewhat controversial – giving vehicle in philanthropy. Their role in shaping the charitable landscape continues to grow, as evidenced by recent data reported by both commercial and community foundations about their donor-advised funds in 2017.

Fidelity Charitable, for example, has operated as an independent public charity since 1991 and currently sponsors the nation’s largest DAF program. It is also the nation’s second-largest grant maker, behind the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In its recently released 2018 Giving Report, Fidelity Charitable shared the following information and insights about the behavior of its nearly 180,000 donors in 2017:

  • There were more than 1 million donor recommended grants, a 25% increase over 2016
  • Donor recommended grants totaled $4.5 billion, a 27% increase over 2016
  • Donor recommended grants went to 127,000 different nonprofits in every state and around the world
  • Individual grants of $1 million or more grew to 505 last year, a 25% increase over 2016
  • 30,000 new donors established more than 21,000 new Giving Accounts

Fidelity Charitable also shared some of the factors behind this DAF activity:

  • Donors gave appreciated assets, such as stocks, which often allows them to give more to charity than by donating cash; non-cash assets made up 61% of 2017 contributions
  • Non-publicly traded assets, such as restricted stock, limited partnership interests and real estate valued $916 million in 2017 donations to Fidelity Charitable
  • Cryptocurrency (such as bitcoin) saw a nearly tenfold increase in usage over 2016 with $69 million in donations; this helps donors eliminate significant capital gains taxes on the appreciation while giving the full fair market value to charity

Donor-advised funds are the fastest-growing way to give in the United States, as illustrated by Fidelity Charitable data: the number of Giving Accounts held at Fidelity Charitable has more than doubled in the last decade and grew 20% between 2016 and 2017. And DAFs are not exclusively for the wealthy: the median account balance at Fidelity Charitable is $19,157, with more than 50% of the accounts having balances under $25,000. The money isn’t necessarily sitting, either. Fidelity Charitable reports donors are actively recommending grants to charities from their Giving Accounts: within five years of a $100 contribution to Fidelity Charitable, $74 has been granted to charities. After 10 years, $88 has gone to charities and only $12 remains to be granted.

Not surprisingly, 2017 saw an emphasis in donor giving from Fidelity Charitable Giving Accounts in response to natural disasters. The American Red Cross made the top of the charity recipients list and Samaritan’s Purse made the list for the first time. The Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity, Oxfam and UNICEF also say increases in giving, most likely due to natural disasters, especially those that happened in late 2017. Impact investing was also noteworthy in 2017 – Fidelity Charitable made more than 4,000 donor recommended grants totaling nearly $19 million. Donors are also requesting more frequently that their Giving Account balances be invested in Fidelity Charitable’s impact-investing pool.

There are certainly clear advantages to using donor-advised funds: flexibility, convenience, investment growth, tax benefits and empowering strategic charitable giving and financial planning.

And of course, there’s the flip side to DAFs:  costs to society in tax revenue, oversight and payout requirements, treatment of sponsoring organizations versus community foundations and the overall impact on donors, nonprofits and other forms of giving.

Most importantly, nonprofits should position themselves to work with and benefit from this giving vehicle. DAFs aren’t going away. So don’t forget some basic DAF best practices:

  • Flag the DAF and gifts in your donor database
  • Recognize the donor in stewardship, not the DAF sponsor
  • Seek to engage the donor, even if the initial gift is small
  • Be sure to include DAFs in your organization’s “Ways of Giving”

Don’t miss The Giving Institute’s Live Webcast of “The Data on Donor-Advised Funds: Insights You Need to Know.”  You can expect to have your most pressing questions about donor-advised funds and how to incorporate this giving vehicle into your fundraising plans answered.

Thursday, March 1
1:00-2:30pm Central
Register Here

Moving the Needle: What Might Be Possible for Philanthropy in America?

By | All Posts, Commentary, Current Events/News, Fundraising, Giving USA, Legislative + Advocacy, The Giving Institute, Uncategorized | No Comments

Leaders in the nonprofit and fundraising sector are gathering soon, through an effort spearheaded by The Giving Institute, to begin developing a plan to help increase charitable giving in America.

American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an estimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016. Total giving rose 2.7 percent in current dollars (1.4 percent adjusted for inflation) over total giving in 2015, and giving to all nine major categories of recipient organizations grew, making 2016 just the sixth time in the past 40 years that this has occurred.

This growth in giving is good.  Yet total giving as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) continues to hover around 2.0 percent as it has for the last six years. So, The Giving Institute is coordinating discussions about a national plan to “move the needle.”

JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne, who served as Board Chair of The Giving Institute from 2015-2017, is among several nonprofit thought leaders who are part of an initial “working committee” to start dialogue about an examination of giving practices and how to increase giving while incorporating input from several people from several sectors (nonprofit, government, corporate, etc.)

Approximately two dozen people will be meeting in Dallas on February 7 to continue developing components of the plan:  focus of the work, organization as a legal entity, potential leadership and staffing, funding, research, information dissemination, federal recognition, communications and building support.

This national examination of giving practices is similar to “The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs” in 1973-1975, most commonly known as “The Filer Commission.” This historical effort was spearheaded by John Filer, chairman of Aetna Insurance, and initiated by John D. Rockefeller, III, after the Tax Reform Act of 1969 was passed.  The Commission’s report, “Giving in America,”  contained recommendations that fell into three categories: 1) proposals involving taxes and giving, 2) interaction among donors, recipients and the public – those who affect the philanthropic process and 3) a proposal for a permanent commission on the nonprofit sector. The commission scrutinized government inducements to giving and considered alternatives such as tax credits and matching grant systems. Members felt the charitable deduction should be “retained and added on to rather than replaced by another form of governmental encouragement to giving.”

There were six main objectives for the commission’s final report: 1) increase the number of people who contribute significantly to and participate in nonprofit activities, 2) increase the amount of giving, 3) increase inducements to giving by those in low- and middle-income brackets, 4) preserve private choice in giving, 5) minimize income loss of nonprofit organizations that depend on the current pattern of giving and 6) be as efficient as possible (meaning, the new levels of  contributions stimulated should at least approximate the amount of government revenue foregone in order to provide this stimulus.) thought leader and participant in this critical/revolutionary time for philanthropy.

JB+A is excited to be part of this exciting and pivotal time for philanthropy – and discovering what might be possible for philanthropy in America in the years ahead.

*Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy in America, has produced comprehensive charitable giving data that are relied on by donors, fundraisers and nonprofit leaders. The research in this annual report estimates all giving to all charitable organizations across the United States.  Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA FoundationTM and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Giving USA FoundationTM, established in 1985 by The Giving Institute, endeavors to advance philanthropy through research and education. Explore Giving USA products and resources, including free highlights of each annual report at its online store at www.givingusa.org for more information.

Tax Reform is Here, but without the Universal Charitable Deduction

By | All Posts, Annual Giving, Boards + Leadership, Commentary, Current Events/News, Fundraising, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, Strategic Planning | No Comments

Through its membership in The Giving Institute (our President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne served as Board Chair for two years) JB+A is a member of the Charitable Giving Coalition (CGC). Below is the statement from the CGC on the final tax reform bill. Join the CGC in reaching out to your Congressional Representatives and U.S. Senators to let them know of the positive impact the charitable deduction has on philanthropy and your organization. 

12/20/17 – CGC DISAPPOINTED CONGRESS FAILS TO ENACT UNIVERSAL CHARITABLE DEDUCTION IN REFORM; VOWS TO CONTINUE PUSH IN 2018

As Congress moves to enact tax reform legislation, lawmakers are failing America’s charities. Instead of preserving a tax incentive that for the past century has helped build a strong and vibrant charitable sector, the final tax reform bill effectively eliminates the charitable deduction for 95% of all taxpayers, dealing a harsh blow to organizations on the frontlines of serving those most in need.

In real terms, more than 30 million taxpayers will no longer be able to deduct their charitable gifts, which will translate to a decline of more than $13 billion in charitable contributions annually. This decline represents between 4% and 6.5% of contributions according to studies by Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University and Tax Policy Center.

Along with leaders from charities across the country, the Charitable Giving Coalition has spent the past year urging members of Congress to address the negative impact on giving that will be triggered by increasing the standard deduction. Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers recognized this reality and its negative consequences. Unfortunately, despite clear and convincing evidence that the plans as introduced will reduce giving, the final tax bill does not include a “fix,” such as a universal charitable deduction for all taxpayers who will take the standard deduction. A universal charitable deduction would not only help recoup the anticipated loss of charitable contributions, but would also promote fairness by allowing all taxpayers to deduct their contributions.

The CGC recognizes that the final tax reform bill maintains the charitable deduction for the limited number of taxpayers who will continue to itemize. The bill also makes two positive adjustments for those taxpayers. First, it allows itemizers to deduct charitable contributions of cash up to 60% of their adjusted gross income (AGI), increasing that limitation from the current 50% level. Second, it repeals the Pease limitation, which had reduced the value of itemized deductions for higher income taxpayers.

While these changes are positive adjustments for the charitable deduction, they will, in no way, make up for the limited availability of the charitable deduction and the loss of billions of dollars in charitable contributions annually.

The stark reality for most charities is that, as government budgets continue to shrink, especially for social services and other programs that benefit communities, charitable contributions are a critical lifeline. Given this reality, it is extraordinarily short-sighted to limit incentives for private contributions to charity. Charitable contributions and the charitable tax deduction are critical for organizations doing vital work in our communities, particularly the small, local charities and congregations already being run on a shoe-string budget that are likely to be hardest-hit by reduced giving. Losing 4-6.5% of their annual budgets will be devastating to these charities and to the vulnerable communities they often serve.

The CGC is deeply committed to pursuing a universal charitable deduction when Congress reconvenes in 2018. In recent months, a groundswell of support has grown among both Republicans and Democrats in the Senate and House. Several members demonstrated they understood the implications on charitable giving of tax reform proposals. And, they acted, introducing both legislation and amendments during consideration of the tax bill. The CGC is deeply grateful for Members’ outspoken support and will build on this momentum to expand the charitable tax deduction to all American taxpayers.

To learn more about the CGC, visit protectgiving.org

See more analysis of tax reform from Dr. Patrick Rooney with the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

It’s #GivingTuesday! Have you joined the movement?

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#GivingTuesday 2017 is finally here!

#GivingTuesday unites:  individuals, communities and organizations around the world come together to celebrate and encourage giving.

Anyone, anywhere can get involved in #GivingTuesday.  And no matter who you are – individual, family, nonprofit, business – JB+A wants YOU to join the movement:  spread the word, support a cause, make a gift, share your story.

How will you participate?  Looking for ways to get involved?

Visit #GivingTuesday’s online directory to find organizations, charities, events and more!

And a special thanks to Lamar Advertising, for its continued partnership in support of #GivingTuesday!

The largest provider of outdoor advertising in Kansas City again collaborated with JB+A to support #GivingTuesday. Since the inception of #GivingTuesday in 2012, Lamar has generously provided pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City area to promote this global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, Lamar donated eight boards over a two-week period, for an estimated 2,786,382 viewing impressions!

Legislative Update: How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Might Affect your Nonprofit

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UPDATE:

On Dec. 2, the Senate passed its version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (S.1). Now that each chamber has passed a version of the bill, it must go to a conference committee to work through differences and draft a single version of the bill that will be sent for another vote in both the House and Senate. If it passes those, then it will go to the President for signature.

On November 1, The House released H.R. 1, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, with several representatives from the nonprofit sector voicing concerns that it would generate dramatic and negative consequences for America’s nonprofits and their constituents.

The Senate bill on tax reform was released November 9, and while many analysts in our sector feel the Senate’s version is not as potentially damaging as that of the House, there are still concerns that the bill does not fully address the components necessary to preserve charitable giving, as it limits the charitable deduction rather than expanding it to all taxpayers by way of a universal charitable deduction. Read The Independent Sector’s summary of the Senate’s tax reform  and its recommended call to action.

The Charitable Giving Coalition is urging all members of the Senate Finance Committee to vote yes on an amendment introduced by Senators Debbie Stabenow and Ron Wyden that would allow an above-the-line deduction for charitable contributions. The maximum deduction would be limited to 60% of modified adjusted gross income and would phase out at higher income levels (by 3% for every dollar of taxable income above $266,700 for single taxpayers, $320,000 for married, and $293,550 for head of household.  View the Coalition’s full release here.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and the Charitable Giving Coalition are urging everyone to continue to reach out to the U.S. Senate regarding its tax reform bill and push Senators to support a universal charitable deduction.  Visit AFP’s website for talking points and sample messaging for communicating with your Senator.

Even though the Thanksgiving holiday is approaching, please reach out to your two U.S. Senators, and encourage your Board members to do so as well.  Your engagement in this critical issue matters.

Tax Reform: What’s the Nonprofit Sector Saying?

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Heather Ehlert, Vice President of Client Services

Whether seeking to end the federal estate tax or adopt a universal charitable deduction – both of which are being discussed by the current Administration and Congress – tax reform is tricky.  While it’s difficult to predict the exact impact these changes would have on charitable giving and nonprofits, we can reasonably conclude they would affect our sector. There’s a lot at stake with tax reform, and nonprofit professionals need to stay abreast of these public policy issues.

Our sector is fortunate to have a number of highly competent bodies monitoring situations like this and advocating in support of nonprofits. For example, Dr. Patrick Rooney, Executive Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and a key participant in the research and writing of Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, wrote an article that was recently published on The Conversation.

In his piece, “How closing the door on the estate tax could reduce American giving,” Dr. Rooney illustrates how the estate tax is a significant revenue generator for the U.S. government and the charitable sector – specifically bequests, which accounted for 8% ($30.36 billion) of total giving in the United States in 2016 (according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016.) He provides an analysis of what could happen after a repeal of the “death tax” and notes the fiscal consequences to federal revenue (a reduction by nearly $270 billion within a decade, according to a bipartisan congressional committee) and the estimated ranges of decline in charitable giving (both bequest and non-bequest giving.)

The Congressional Business Office estimated a 6% decline in charitable giving if the estate tax was repealed.  But that analysis was way back in 2004, and a much different scenario exists today.  Other studies estimate a decline of between 12% and 37%, but Dr. Rooney feels these figures probably underestimate the actual effects of a repeal, and walks us through what actually happened in 2010 when the estate tax was temporarily paused to support his hypothesis.  He concludes that if the estate tax was eliminated, giving to charity would be negatively impacted – by reducing giving both during and after donors’ lifetimes. Be sure to check out Dr. Rooney’s full article on The Conversation.

As nonprofit professionals, philanthropic leaders and American citizens it is also our duty (and privilege) to interact with, educate and influence our representatives in government. There are many ways you can advocate for the philanthropic sector. If you’re interested in learning more, check out Jeffrey Byrne’s piece on Advocacy in Philanthropy from the JB+A archives.

JB+A Client Partner Mattie Rhodes Center Awarded Missouri Neighborhood Assistance Program Tax Credits

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Mattie Rhodes Center (MRC) enriches the lives of individuals, families and communities in a respectful, multi-cultural environment. Since its inception more than 120 years ago, MRC’s call to community service has been to champion the needs of others. Today, its community service calls for them to campaign for the continued evolution of cultural arts as a tool for education and unification.

MRC identified the need to expand service space and decrease costs within the cultural arts area of the agency, which is based out of the Westside neighborhood of Kansas City, Missouri. It acquired land to build a new Cultural Center and JB+A helped it begin its EXPLORE. LEARN. CREATE. BELONG. Campaign to raise funds for constructing the new Center. Part of its fundraising plan included applying for tax credits from the Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP).  This program provides assistance to community-based organizations that enables them to implement community or neighborhood projects in the areas of community service, education, crime prevention, job training and physical revitalization. The Department of Economic Development will issue 50% or 70% tax credits to an eligible taxpayer who makes a qualified contribution to an approved NAP project.  MRC was notified by the Missouri DED in late August it was awarded $200,000 in NAP tax credits to utilize in raising funds for its new Cultural Center.  The $200,000 in 50% tax credits can generate $400,000 in contributions to the MRC campaign for its new Cultural Center. Congratulations Mattie Rhodes Center!

The new Mattie Rhodes Cultural Center will be a safe and welcoming environment that will supplement its other facilities. The building will be anchored by four pillars: 1) educational programs, 2) gallery/exhibit space, 3) cultural exchange and 4) event/gathering space. The new Center will be an energy-efficient building that is artistically and culturally appropriate and inviting for the neighborhood. The facility will be constructed to accommodate flexible, multi-functional exhibition and classroom space. Off-street and handicap-accessible parking will be provided. The new Cultural Center will provide a permanent home for Kansas City’s only collection of international folk art – the Hand-In-Hand Folk Art Collection, gallery space, open classrooms, community event space, gift and retail space.

Learn more about MRC and its new Cultural Center here.

To learn more about the Missouri DED NAP tax credits and eligibility criteria for donors, visit here.