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Current Events/News

501 (c) Success National Speaker Series 2018

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Mark Your Calendars

JB+A is a proud sponsor of the 501(c)Success National Speaker Series, a program of Nonprofit Connect. Committed to ensuring you have access to solid, informative and thought-provoking discussions on topics that affect your daily work in the nonprofit sector, this Speaker Series brings the brightest national thought leaders to Kansas City, to discuss progressive topics that are relevant and timely in our industry.

You won’t want to miss the fantastic presenters lined up for 2018:

Anne Wallestad – April 26

Anne Wallestad serves as president and CEO of BoardSource, a globally recognized nonprofit focused on strengthening nonprofit leadership at the highest level — the Board of directors.

Dr. Patrick Rooney – June 15 – Giving USA 2018: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2017

Dr. Rooney is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research and Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, and annually presents Giving USA, the longest-running and most comprehensive evaluation of philanthropic trends in the United States, here in Kansas City.

Erik Daubert – September 11

Erik is regarded as a leader in the areas of financial development and nonprofit management. In addition to a broad based career in nonprofits, he has also served as a consultant and founding partner in multiple nonprofit and for-profit organizations.

All 2018 programs will be held at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.  Stay tuned for more updates and information about our presenters.

Moving the Needle: What Might Be Possible for Philanthropy in America?

By | All Posts, Commentary, Current Events/News, Fundraising, Giving USA, Legislative + Advocacy, The Giving Institute, Uncategorized | No Comments

Leaders in the nonprofit and fundraising sector are gathering soon, through an effort spearheaded by The Giving Institute, to begin developing a plan to help increase charitable giving in America.

American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an estimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016. Total giving rose 2.7 percent in current dollars (1.4 percent adjusted for inflation) over total giving in 2015, and giving to all nine major categories of recipient organizations grew, making 2016 just the sixth time in the past 40 years that this has occurred.

This growth in giving is good.  Yet total giving as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) continues to hover around 2.0 percent as it has for the last six years. So, The Giving Institute is coordinating discussions about a national plan to “move the needle.”

JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne, who served as Board Chair of The Giving Institute from 2015-2017, is among several nonprofit thought leaders who are part of an initial “working committee” to start dialogue about an examination of giving practices and how to increase giving while incorporating input from several people from several sectors (nonprofit, government, corporate, etc.)

Approximately two dozen people will be meeting in Dallas on February 7 to continue developing components of the plan:  focus of the work, organization as a legal entity, potential leadership and staffing, funding, research, information dissemination, federal recognition, communications and building support.

This national examination of giving practices is similar to “The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs” in 1973-1975, most commonly known as “The Filer Commission.” This historical effort was spearheaded by John Filer, chairman of Aetna Insurance, and initiated by John D. Rockefeller, III, after the Tax Reform Act of 1969 was passed.  The Commission’s report, “Giving in America,”  contained recommendations that fell into three categories: 1) proposals involving taxes and giving, 2) interaction among donors, recipients and the public – those who affect the philanthropic process and 3) a proposal for a permanent commission on the nonprofit sector. The commission scrutinized government inducements to giving and considered alternatives such as tax credits and matching grant systems. Members felt the charitable deduction should be “retained and added on to rather than replaced by another form of governmental encouragement to giving.”

There were six main objectives for the commission’s final report: 1) increase the number of people who contribute significantly to and participate in nonprofit activities, 2) increase the amount of giving, 3) increase inducements to giving by those in low- and middle-income brackets, 4) preserve private choice in giving, 5) minimize income loss of nonprofit organizations that depend on the current pattern of giving and 6) be as efficient as possible (meaning, the new levels of  contributions stimulated should at least approximate the amount of government revenue foregone in order to provide this stimulus.) thought leader and participant in this critical/revolutionary time for philanthropy.

JB+A is excited to be part of this exciting and pivotal time for philanthropy – and discovering what might be possible for philanthropy in America in the years ahead.

*Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy in America, has produced comprehensive charitable giving data that are relied on by donors, fundraisers and nonprofit leaders. The research in this annual report estimates all giving to all charitable organizations across the United States.  Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA FoundationTM and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Giving USA FoundationTM, established in 1985 by The Giving Institute, endeavors to advance philanthropy through research and education. Explore Giving USA products and resources, including free highlights of each annual report at its online store at www.givingusa.org for more information.

Tax Reform is Here, but without the Universal Charitable Deduction

By | All Posts, Annual Giving, Boards + Leadership, Commentary, Current Events/News, Fundraising, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, Strategic Planning | No Comments

Through its membership in The Giving Institute (our President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne served as Board Chair for two years) JB+A is a member of the Charitable Giving Coalition (CGC). Below is the statement from the CGC on the final tax reform bill. Join the CGC in reaching out to your Congressional Representatives and U.S. Senators to let them know of the positive impact the charitable deduction has on philanthropy and your organization. 

12/20/17 – CGC DISAPPOINTED CONGRESS FAILS TO ENACT UNIVERSAL CHARITABLE DEDUCTION IN REFORM; VOWS TO CONTINUE PUSH IN 2018

As Congress moves to enact tax reform legislation, lawmakers are failing America’s charities. Instead of preserving a tax incentive that for the past century has helped build a strong and vibrant charitable sector, the final tax reform bill effectively eliminates the charitable deduction for 95% of all taxpayers, dealing a harsh blow to organizations on the frontlines of serving those most in need.

In real terms, more than 30 million taxpayers will no longer be able to deduct their charitable gifts, which will translate to a decline of more than $13 billion in charitable contributions annually. This decline represents between 4% and 6.5% of contributions according to studies by Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University and Tax Policy Center.

Along with leaders from charities across the country, the Charitable Giving Coalition has spent the past year urging members of Congress to address the negative impact on giving that will be triggered by increasing the standard deduction. Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers recognized this reality and its negative consequences. Unfortunately, despite clear and convincing evidence that the plans as introduced will reduce giving, the final tax bill does not include a “fix,” such as a universal charitable deduction for all taxpayers who will take the standard deduction. A universal charitable deduction would not only help recoup the anticipated loss of charitable contributions, but would also promote fairness by allowing all taxpayers to deduct their contributions.

The CGC recognizes that the final tax reform bill maintains the charitable deduction for the limited number of taxpayers who will continue to itemize. The bill also makes two positive adjustments for those taxpayers. First, it allows itemizers to deduct charitable contributions of cash up to 60% of their adjusted gross income (AGI), increasing that limitation from the current 50% level. Second, it repeals the Pease limitation, which had reduced the value of itemized deductions for higher income taxpayers.

While these changes are positive adjustments for the charitable deduction, they will, in no way, make up for the limited availability of the charitable deduction and the loss of billions of dollars in charitable contributions annually.

The stark reality for most charities is that, as government budgets continue to shrink, especially for social services and other programs that benefit communities, charitable contributions are a critical lifeline. Given this reality, it is extraordinarily short-sighted to limit incentives for private contributions to charity. Charitable contributions and the charitable tax deduction are critical for organizations doing vital work in our communities, particularly the small, local charities and congregations already being run on a shoe-string budget that are likely to be hardest-hit by reduced giving. Losing 4-6.5% of their annual budgets will be devastating to these charities and to the vulnerable communities they often serve.

The CGC is deeply committed to pursuing a universal charitable deduction when Congress reconvenes in 2018. In recent months, a groundswell of support has grown among both Republicans and Democrats in the Senate and House. Several members demonstrated they understood the implications on charitable giving of tax reform proposals. And, they acted, introducing both legislation and amendments during consideration of the tax bill. The CGC is deeply grateful for Members’ outspoken support and will build on this momentum to expand the charitable tax deduction to all American taxpayers.

To learn more about the CGC, visit protectgiving.org

See more analysis of tax reform from Dr. Patrick Rooney with the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

It’s #GivingTuesday! Have you joined the movement?

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#GivingTuesday 2017 is finally here!

#GivingTuesday unites:  individuals, communities and organizations around the world come together to celebrate and encourage giving.

Anyone, anywhere can get involved in #GivingTuesday.  And no matter who you are – individual, family, nonprofit, business – JB+A wants YOU to join the movement:  spread the word, support a cause, make a gift, share your story.

How will you participate?  Looking for ways to get involved?

Visit #GivingTuesday’s online directory to find organizations, charities, events and more!

And a special thanks to Lamar Advertising, for its continued partnership in support of #GivingTuesday!

The largest provider of outdoor advertising in Kansas City again collaborated with JB+A to support #GivingTuesday. Since the inception of #GivingTuesday in 2012, Lamar has generously provided pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City area to promote this global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, Lamar donated eight boards over a two-week period, for an estimated 2,786,382 viewing impressions!

#GivingTuesday: Behold…Billboards!

By | Current Events/News, News You Can Use, Social Media, Technology, Volunteers | No Comments

The largest provider of outdoor advertising in Kansas City is again collaborating with JB+A to support #GivingTuesday. Since the inception of #GivingTuesday in 2012, Lamar has generously provided pro bono digital billboards throughout the Greater Kansas City area to promote this global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. This year, Lamar is donating eight boards over a two-week period, for an estimated 2,786,382 viewing impressions!

Dave Halpin, Sales Manager for Lamar in Kansas City, shared his thoughts on the importance of #GivingTuesday: “As the largest provider for outdoor advertising in Kansas City, Lamar embraces this opportunity to support #GivingTuesday for the fifth consecutive year.  We are committed to doing anything we can to make this community stronger while demonstrating the giving spirit embraced by all of our employees.”

Thank you, Lamar Advertising, for this continued partnership in support of #GivingTuesday!

 #GivingTuesday 2017 is a week away!  (Nov. 28) Every year since its inception, the #GivingTuesday movement has had increasing success.  Last year, 98 countries participated through 2.4 million social media impressions and 1.64 million gifts to raise $177 million online.  What will 2017 bring?

Anyone, anywhere can get involved in #GivingTuesday. And no matter who you are – individual, family, nonprofit, business – JB+A wants YOU to join the movement:  spread the word, support a cause, make a gift, share your story.

Check out the JB+A #GivingTuesday Guide here.

Legislative Update: How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Might Affect your Nonprofit

By | All Posts, Current Events/News, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, The Giving Institute | No Comments

UPDATE:

On Dec. 2, the Senate passed its version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (S.1). Now that each chamber has passed a version of the bill, it must go to a conference committee to work through differences and draft a single version of the bill that will be sent for another vote in both the House and Senate. If it passes those, then it will go to the President for signature.

On November 1, The House released H.R. 1, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, with several representatives from the nonprofit sector voicing concerns that it would generate dramatic and negative consequences for America’s nonprofits and their constituents.

The Senate bill on tax reform was released November 9, and while many analysts in our sector feel the Senate’s version is not as potentially damaging as that of the House, there are still concerns that the bill does not fully address the components necessary to preserve charitable giving, as it limits the charitable deduction rather than expanding it to all taxpayers by way of a universal charitable deduction. Read The Independent Sector’s summary of the Senate’s tax reform  and its recommended call to action.

The Charitable Giving Coalition is urging all members of the Senate Finance Committee to vote yes on an amendment introduced by Senators Debbie Stabenow and Ron Wyden that would allow an above-the-line deduction for charitable contributions. The maximum deduction would be limited to 60% of modified adjusted gross income and would phase out at higher income levels (by 3% for every dollar of taxable income above $266,700 for single taxpayers, $320,000 for married, and $293,550 for head of household.  View the Coalition’s full release here.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and the Charitable Giving Coalition are urging everyone to continue to reach out to the U.S. Senate regarding its tax reform bill and push Senators to support a universal charitable deduction.  Visit AFP’s website for talking points and sample messaging for communicating with your Senator.

Even though the Thanksgiving holiday is approaching, please reach out to your two U.S. Senators, and encourage your Board members to do so as well.  Your engagement in this critical issue matters.

JB+A Own Katie Lord is One of KC’s “Most Wanted”

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Each year, a group of charitable, passionate, hard-working professionals are chosen to be honored by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City as “KC’s Most Wanted.” These honorees are movers and shakers who are making a big difference in their professions and in their community – and JB+A’s very own Vice President Katie Lord is on the list for 2017!

Each year, a group of charitable, passionate, hard-working professionals are chosen to be honored by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City as “KC’s Most Wanted.” These honorees are movers and shakers who are making a big difference in their professions and in their community – -and JB+A’s very own Vice President Katie Lord is on the list for 2017!

“I’m delighted for Katie and this honor, but I’m especially proud of her commitment – personally and professionally — to strengthening our community,” says JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne.  Katie will be recognized with her fellow honorees at the annual Most Wanted Auction on December 2, at Arvest Bank Theater at the Midland. Each honoree will create a unique, one-of-a-kind live auction package, gather silent auction items and raise funds to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City and its mission of creating and supporting life-changing friendships for children.  “Having just had my first child, I understand aspiring to be a role model and friend not only in her life but in the lives of other children. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City allows adults and children to create these special, life-changing relationships,” says Katie. “I’m incredibly honored to be named one of KC’s Most Wanted Honorees.”

From all of us at JB+A, congratulations Katie!

For more information about KC’s Most Wanted, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City and to leave Katie a note of support, visit here. 

Response from the Charitable Giving Coalition to H.R. 1, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

By | All Posts, Commentary, Current Events/News, Legislative + Advocacy, The Giving Institute | One Comment

Through its membership in The Giving Institute (our President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne served as Board Chair for two years) JB+A is a member of the Charitable Giving Coalition.  We will continue to carefully monitor the progress of this proposed legislation as it winds its way through the halls of Congress, and will continue to keep you updated. There’s obviously a lot at stake, and we need to stay abreast of these public policy issues.

 Consider sharing these updates with your senior executive team, your entire fundraising staff and your Board of Directors. Reach out to your Congressional Representatives and U. S. Senators to let them know of the positive impact the charitable deduction has on philanthropy and your organization.  Keeping elected officials informed on the positive impact of legislation within their districts is critical to persuading Congress to pass a permanent version of this proven charitable giving incentive. 

As the current Administration and Congress continue to propose various options for tax reform, we know these changes will affect charitable giving and the nonprofit sector. The latest tax reform framework was released last Wednesday, November 1, in H.R. 1, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. What are the potential consequences of this proposed legislation on America’s charitable organizations and those they serve?

The Charitable Giving Coalition (CGC), (a group of more than 175 diverse organizations representing private and community foundations, their grantees and independent charities, as well as nonprofit organizations and the associations and umbrella groups) is dedicated to preserving the charitable tax deduction – crucial to ensuring our nation’s charities receive the funds necessary to fulfill their essential philanthropic missions.

The CGC provides a unique and unified voice on Capitol Hill, and recently released a statement outlining its concerns that The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) will generate dramatic and negative consequences for America’s nonprofits and their constituents.

This proposed revision to the tax code doubles the standard deduction and shifts millions of taxpayers who currently itemize to taking the standard deduction. As many as 30 million taxpayers who itemized in 2016 would no longer have access to charitable giving incentive and would be taxed on their gifts.

While the CGC is grateful that H.R. 1 retains the charitable tax deduction for those who itemize, it articulates that “the result of this provision alone could be a staggering loss of up to $13.1 billion in contributions annually, undermining America’s charitable organizations and our country’s extraordinary tradition of philanthropy. The charitable deduction would be available to only 5% of all taxpayers – causing this significant drop in contributions. Up to 95% of taxpayers will be taxed on their gifts to charity.”

As an alternative to H.R. 1, the CGC offers a resolution it feels is fair and efficient and will continue to encourage Americans to donate to charities:  a universal charitable deduction available to all taxpayers. The CGC believes that continuing to incentivize the deduction for charitable giving would offset anticipated losses and potentially gain an additional $7billion annually for America’s charitable organizations while encouraging younger taxpayers to begin charitable giving earlier.

Read the full press release from the CGC here.

Click here to learn more about the CGC.

Tax Reform: What’s the Nonprofit Sector Saying?

By | Commentary, Current Events/News, Legislative + Advocacy, News You Can Use, Planned Giving | No Comments

Heather Ehlert, Vice President of Client Services

Whether seeking to end the federal estate tax or adopt a universal charitable deduction – both of which are being discussed by the current Administration and Congress – tax reform is tricky.  While it’s difficult to predict the exact impact these changes would have on charitable giving and nonprofits, we can reasonably conclude they would affect our sector. There’s a lot at stake with tax reform, and nonprofit professionals need to stay abreast of these public policy issues.

Our sector is fortunate to have a number of highly competent bodies monitoring situations like this and advocating in support of nonprofits. For example, Dr. Patrick Rooney, Executive Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and a key participant in the research and writing of Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, wrote an article that was recently published on The Conversation.

In his piece, “How closing the door on the estate tax could reduce American giving,” Dr. Rooney illustrates how the estate tax is a significant revenue generator for the U.S. government and the charitable sector – specifically bequests, which accounted for 8% ($30.36 billion) of total giving in the United States in 2016 (according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016.) He provides an analysis of what could happen after a repeal of the “death tax” and notes the fiscal consequences to federal revenue (a reduction by nearly $270 billion within a decade, according to a bipartisan congressional committee) and the estimated ranges of decline in charitable giving (both bequest and non-bequest giving.)

The Congressional Business Office estimated a 6% decline in charitable giving if the estate tax was repealed.  But that analysis was way back in 2004, and a much different scenario exists today.  Other studies estimate a decline of between 12% and 37%, but Dr. Rooney feels these figures probably underestimate the actual effects of a repeal, and walks us through what actually happened in 2010 when the estate tax was temporarily paused to support his hypothesis.  He concludes that if the estate tax was eliminated, giving to charity would be negatively impacted – by reducing giving both during and after donors’ lifetimes. Be sure to check out Dr. Rooney’s full article on The Conversation.

As nonprofit professionals, philanthropic leaders and American citizens it is also our duty (and privilege) to interact with, educate and influence our representatives in government. There are many ways you can advocate for the philanthropic sector. If you’re interested in learning more, check out Jeffrey Byrne’s piece on Advocacy in Philanthropy from the JB+A archives.