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Current Events/News

Inaugural National History Academy

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Editor’s Note: JB+A is proud to share this special piece with you, which showcases former JB+A Consultant and current colleague and friend, Bill Sellers. Bill is President of Journey Through Hallowed Ground, a nonprofit partnership that promotes and supports civic engagement through history education, economic development through heritage tourism and the preservation of cultural landscapes in a 180-mile corridor from Gettysburg, PA through Maryland and Harpers Ferry, WV to Jefferson’s Monticello in Charlottesville, VA.

Bill Sellers feels there is a “crisis in historical and civic literacy.” A recent report by the National Assessment of Educational Progress concluded that only 18% of high school seniors showed proficiency in their knowledge of American history and 23% were proficient in civics. Of the seven subjects included in the Report, students scored lowest in their knowledge of U.S. history.

Bill is actively doing something to reverse these statistics — by providing future leaders with a “multidimensional, contextual understanding of history and its figures.” Bill developed the National History Academy, a five-week residential summer program for high school students to not just learn American history, but live it.

Bill Sellers describes the vision for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: walking in the footsteps of leaders who helped define and shape the American story including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Brown, Harriet Tubman, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr., and where soldiers fought for the birth and survival of this nation. Students will experience traditional classroom learning, but more importantly, visit 42 sites within the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area.

The region was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of the 11 most endangered places in the United States in 2005, was declared by Congress as a National Heritage Area in 2008, and Route 15/20 was named a National Scenic Byway in 2009. The Journey includes 12 National Parks, nine presidential sites, 30 historic Main Street communities, dozens of Civil War battlefields, and over 100 sites related to the fight for Civil Rights.

The mission of the Academy is to “foster an understanding of key events, people and issues in the country’s history and to engage our nation’s future leaders in the rights and duties of American citizenship through place-based, experiential learning.”  Its motto, “Historia Est Magistra Vitae” is taken from Cicero’s De Oratore and means “history is the teacher of life.”

Highly motivated students in 10th, 11th and 12th grades may apply. The application process includes a short application and a short response to the question, “Tell us why you want to be a part of the National History Academy in two paragraphs.”

Applications will be reviewed by a committee and judged on maturity of response and understanding of the topic. One-hundred students will be accepted into the Academy. Successful applicants will then be invited to register for the Academy, which runs June 24 to July 28, 2018.  A limited amount of financial aid is available.

To learn more about the National History Academy, visit here.

To learn more about Journey Through Hallowed Ground, visit here.

Bill and the Academy are also featured in the May-June 2018 issue of Harvard Magazine, which is published by a separately incorporated nonprofit affiliate of Harvard University, Bill’s alma mater.

JB+A Client Success: Congratulations PKD Foundation: JYNARQUE™ Approved as First Treatment for Polycystic Kidney Disease

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JB+A is excited to share good news involving its client partner, PKD Foundation. PKD, a chronic, genetic disease, is characterized by uncontrolled growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs and can lead to kidney failure. Previously, there had been no treatment specifically for PKD in the U.S., with the only option for survival a transplant or dialysis. Today, there is new hope.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted approval of JYNARQUE™ (tolvaptan) to be the first treatment in the U.S for adult patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common form of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The PKD Foundation not only supported early studies that led to the development of JYNARQUE™ as a treatment, but also helped guide PKD patients to the JYNARQUE™ clinical trials.

Although not a cure, patients who are prescribed JYNARQUE™ for PKD will see a slower decline in their kidney function, leading to improved health and well-being. “Today is an historic day in providing hope to patients with polycystic kidney disease, and we are thrilled to be a part of this first milestone to treat patients with ADPKD,” said Andy Betts, CEO of the PKD Foundation. “For the past 35 years, our goal has been to support PKD patients from care to cure. It is gratifying to play a part in the discovery of this treatment and to see it come to fruition.”

Betts also recognizes all of the patients who graciously took the time and resources to participate in the clinical trials to bring JYNARQUE™ to the PKD community: “This treatment would not exist without these patients,” says Betts. “We hope that this is just the beginning of new treatments on the horizon for patients suffering from PKD. We will continue to stand beside PKD patients until there is a cure, supporting them with access to future studies, to new treatments, and to ensure the affordability of care.”

JB+A is proud of PKD Foundation for this milestone achievement, and for the unwavering care and support it provides to those living with PKD.

About PKD Foundation:
PKD Foundation has been dedicated since its founding in 1982 to supporting and improving the lives of patients affected by polycystic kidney disease. These efforts are accomplished through promoting research to find treatments and a cure, as well as providing education, advocacy and awareness on a national level. The Foundation provides direct services to local communities nationwide and is the largest private funder of PKD research.

PKD Foundation is the only organization in the United States solely dedicated to finding treatments and a cure for PKD. Our mission: We give hope. We fund research, advocate for patients and build a community for all affected by polycystic kidney disease (PKD).

To learn more about PKD Foundation, visit here.

To learn more about JYNARQUE™, visit here.

Director of Development Opportunities with JB+A Client Covenant Retirement Communities

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JB+A Client Covenant Retirement Communities is a faith-based organization providing retirement housing and senior care. From the establishment of its first community – Covenant Home of Chicago in 1886 – to becoming the fifth-largest not-for-profit Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) sponsor in the LeadingAge Ziegler Top 150, its goal has been to provide outstanding care and services to senior adults.

A ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church, Covenant Retirement Communities is headquartered in suburban Chicago and operates 12 Continuing Care Retirement Communities across the U.S. Each community offers a comfortably independent and active lifestyle, creating joy and peace of mind for residents and their families by providing a better way of life.

Covenant Retirement Communities’ 12 CCRC communities are:

  • Covenant Shores (Mercer Island, WA)
  • Covenant Village of Colorado (Westminster, CO)
  • Covenant Village of Cromwell (Cromwell, CT)
  • Covenant Village of Florida (Plantation, FL)
  • Covenant Village of Golden Valley (Golden Valley, MN)
  • Covenant Village of the Great Lakes (Grand Rapids, MI)
  • Covenant Village of Northbrook (Northbrook, Ill)
  • Covenant Village of Turlock (Turlock, CA)
  • The Holmstad (Batavia, Ill)
  • Mount Miguel Covenant Village (Spring Valley, CA)
  • The Samarkand (Santa Barbara, CA)
  • Windsor Park (Carol Stream, Ill)

Strengthening the Mission of Covenant Retirement Communities through Enhanced Fundraising

Covenant Retirement Communities is taking steps to ensure it is prepared to meet the needs of a growing senior population.  It is currently developing a plan to grow its resources to support a significantly larger Benevolent Care endowment fund, programs and special capital projects. A historic fundraising effort seeking contributions from a variety of donors will help provide the reassurance current and future residents need to live in an environment of grace and peace.

Covenant Retirement Communities is searching for qualified fundraising professionals to serve as Directors of Development in three of its communities:

Background

The Director of Development (DOD) works with the Executive Director to develop and manage a comprehensive fundraising program on the campus. This position has the responsibility to secure philanthropic support through annual gifts, major gifts and legacy gifts with an aggressive focus on outright major gifts from non-resident sources to support the campus benevolent care program needs. The DOD is responsible for the planning, administration and implementation of development goals, objectives and initiatives of the community.

Responsibilities

This position respectfully interacts with and maintains positive relationships, with residents, resident family members, visitors and employees, practicing honesty and integrity in all aspects of job performance. In performance of duties, the Director of Development is entrusted with the following responsibilities:

  • Develop and execute an annual campus fundraising plan (including specific metrics for funds raised and other goals to be achieved).
  • Secure financial support from a portfolio of residents, families, and other individuals as well as vendors, churches and other organizations.
  • Develop, maintain, and track ongoing relationships with major donors.
  • Create and execute the strategy for growing a sustained base of annual fund individual donors (residents, families and other individuals).
  • Monitor and evaluate all fundraising activities to ensure that the fundraising goals are being achieved (including: total dollars raised, total dollars solicited, number of asks made, and number of gifts received).
  • Develop and manage timelines for various fundraising activities to ensure strategic plans and critical fundraising processes are carried out in a timely manner.
  • Develop and manage the donor recognition program including events, the donor recognition wall and donor lists.
  • Oversee the campus fundraising database coordinator to make sure gift entry and acknowledgment is done on a timely basis and ensure that donor/prospect profile information is current and accurate.
  • Perform other related responsibilities as assigned.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s Degree.
  • 5-7 years of relationship-building fundraising experience with an emphasis on personal solicitation of annual, major and planned gifts.
  • Demonstrated comfort and experience with identifying, cultivating, closing, and stewarding significant gifts ($20,000+).
  • Demonstrated experience collaborating with site leadership in developing fundraising strategies and plans/metrics to meet fundraising goals.
  • Strong relationship management.
  • A commitment to the mission and values of Covenant Retirement Communities as a faith-based organization.

Application Instructions

For consideration, candidates should submit a cover letter, resume and three professional references. Your cover letter should articulate your experience and qualifications for the position. Please send materials to: CRCExecSearch@FundraisingJBA.com and put the name of the community in which you are interested in the subject line.

Covenant Retirement Communities believes it is a great place to work. Covenant Retirement Communities believes its employees are inspired to serve. Covenant Retirement Communities believes in making a difference in other’s lives. Covenant Retirement Communities has approximately 3,200 employees serving more than 5,000 residents in its nationwide family of continuing care retirement communities and home health. Construction and development continue on several of its campuses, ensuring ever more exciting opportunities for employees to serve residents.

For full time employees, CRC offers a generous benefits package that includes medical, dental and vision insurance; employer paid group term life and disability, Paid Time Off (PTO) and six paid holidays; a 403(b) with a 3% employer match and other various voluntary benefits such as Life, AD&D; tuition assistance and scholarships; employee assistance program; legal services, home/auto insurance, discount purchasing program; pet insurance and fitness center use at most facilities.

Covenant Retirement Communities is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, disability, marital status, pregnancy, protected veteran status, protected genetic information, or any other characteristics protected by local laws, regulations, or ordinances.

JB+A’s Katie Lord is Named to Centurions Leadership Program!

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JB+A Vice President Katie Lord has been accepted as a member of the Centurions Leadership Program’s Spring Class of 2020. Katie’s proven career success and strong commitment to greater Kansas City will help her make important contributions as a Centurion.

A program of the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, the mission of Centurions is to prepare a representative cross-section of the community’s emerging leaders for their role in shaping the future of greater Kansas City. As a Centurion, Katie will spend two years exploring the opportunities and issues of the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Since 1976, Centurions Leadership Program has earned its reputation as an unequaled training ground for future Kansas City leaders. Today, the two-year program has more than 80 active Centurions who join more than 1,200 alumni. The program is close-knit group of women and men from diverse backgrounds who are expanding their personal and professional networks within the group and throughout the community they serve.

“I’m delighted for Katie and this honor, but I’m especially proud of her commitment – personally and professionally — to strengthening our community,” says JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne.

Grateful for the opportunity and support of the Centurion Program, Katie shares, “I am humbled to participate in this unique Kansas City leadership program as I strive to better serve both my profession in the nonprofit sector and our great community.”

Congratulations, Katie!

Questions about Donor-Advised Funds? Get them Answered Here: The Giving Institute Webcast on Donor-Advised Funds

By | All Posts, Annual Giving, Capacity Building, Current Events/News, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Giving USA, Grants, News You Can Use, The Giving Institute | No Comments

Until this Giving USA Special Report, there has been little aggregate information available about the granting side of the donor-advised fund equation. How much do donor-advised funds give to nonprofits annually? Which types of nonprofits do donor-advised funds support, and which types receive the most and the least from donor-advised fund grants? How have these trends changed over time?

Register now for “The Data on Donor-Advised Funds: New Insights You Need to Know,” The Giving Institute’s complimentary webcast exploring donor-advised funds – one of today’s hottest topics with donors, nonprofits and public policy experts.

Thursday, March 1
1:00-2:30pm Central

Register Here 

Expert panelists will discuss the latest Giving USA Special Report on donor-advised funds (DAFs), taking a rigorous, new and in-depth look at where DAF money goes. The webcast will address these pressing questions and offer guidance on how to incorporate this giving vehicle into your fundraising plans.

Panelists include:

  • Mike Geary, Attorney at Law, LLC, at Geary, Porter & Donovan, P.C.
  • Pam Norley, President of Fidelity Charitable
  • Una Osili, Professor of Economics and Associate Dean for Research and International Programs, Indiana University, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Dave Scullin, CEO of the Communities Foundation of Texas

The Giving Institute webcasts always include time for questions from the audience, so don’t miss out on your chance to have your most burning questions about DAFs answered!

 

Donor-Advised Funds: Stronger than Ever

By | All Posts, Capacity Building, Current Events/News, Donor Cultivation, Fundraising, Grants, News You Can Use, Planned Giving | No Comments

Heather Ehlert
Vice President of Client Services

As fundraisers and nonprofit managers, we know donor-advised funds (DAFs) have become a very popular – albeit somewhat controversial – giving vehicle in philanthropy. Their role in shaping the charitable landscape continues to grow, as evidenced by recent data reported by both commercial and community foundations about their donor-advised funds in 2017.

Fidelity Charitable, for example, has operated as an independent public charity since 1991 and currently sponsors the nation’s largest DAF program. It is also the nation’s second-largest grant maker, behind the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In its recently released 2018 Giving Report, Fidelity Charitable shared the following information and insights about the behavior of its nearly 180,000 donors in 2017:

  • There were more than 1 million donor recommended grants, a 25% increase over 2016
  • Donor recommended grants totaled $4.5 billion, a 27% increase over 2016
  • Donor recommended grants went to 127,000 different nonprofits in every state and around the world
  • Individual grants of $1 million or more grew to 505 last year, a 25% increase over 2016
  • 30,000 new donors established more than 21,000 new Giving Accounts

Fidelity Charitable also shared some of the factors behind this DAF activity:

  • Donors gave appreciated assets, such as stocks, which often allows them to give more to charity than by donating cash; non-cash assets made up 61% of 2017 contributions
  • Non-publicly traded assets, such as restricted stock, limited partnership interests and real estate valued $916 million in 2017 donations to Fidelity Charitable
  • Cryptocurrency (such as bitcoin) saw a nearly tenfold increase in usage over 2016 with $69 million in donations; this helps donors eliminate significant capital gains taxes on the appreciation while giving the full fair market value to charity

Donor-advised funds are the fastest-growing way to give in the United States, as illustrated by Fidelity Charitable data: the number of Giving Accounts held at Fidelity Charitable has more than doubled in the last decade and grew 20% between 2016 and 2017. And DAFs are not exclusively for the wealthy: the median account balance at Fidelity Charitable is $19,157, with more than 50% of the accounts having balances under $25,000. The money isn’t necessarily sitting, either. Fidelity Charitable reports donors are actively recommending grants to charities from their Giving Accounts: within five years of a $100 contribution to Fidelity Charitable, $74 has been granted to charities. After 10 years, $88 has gone to charities and only $12 remains to be granted.

Not surprisingly, 2017 saw an emphasis in donor giving from Fidelity Charitable Giving Accounts in response to natural disasters. The American Red Cross made the top of the charity recipients list and Samaritan’s Purse made the list for the first time. The Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity, Oxfam and UNICEF also say increases in giving, most likely due to natural disasters, especially those that happened in late 2017. Impact investing was also noteworthy in 2017 – Fidelity Charitable made more than 4,000 donor recommended grants totaling nearly $19 million. Donors are also requesting more frequently that their Giving Account balances be invested in Fidelity Charitable’s impact-investing pool.

There are certainly clear advantages to using donor-advised funds: flexibility, convenience, investment growth, tax benefits and empowering strategic charitable giving and financial planning.

And of course, there’s the flip side to DAFs:  costs to society in tax revenue, oversight and payout requirements, treatment of sponsoring organizations versus community foundations and the overall impact on donors, nonprofits and other forms of giving.

Most importantly, nonprofits should position themselves to work with and benefit from this giving vehicle. DAFs aren’t going away. So don’t forget some basic DAF best practices:

  • Flag the DAF and gifts in your donor database
  • Recognize the donor in stewardship, not the DAF sponsor
  • Seek to engage the donor, even if the initial gift is small
  • Be sure to include DAFs in your organization’s “Ways of Giving”

Don’t miss The Giving Institute’s Live Webcast of “The Data on Donor-Advised Funds: Insights You Need to Know.”  You can expect to have your most pressing questions about donor-advised funds and how to incorporate this giving vehicle into your fundraising plans answered.

Thursday, March 1
1:00-2:30pm Central
Register Here

501 (c) Success National Speaker Series 2018

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Mark Your Calendars

JB+A is a proud sponsor of the 501(c)Success National Speaker Series, a program of Nonprofit Connect. Committed to ensuring you have access to solid, informative and thought-provoking discussions on topics that affect your daily work in the nonprofit sector, this Speaker Series brings the brightest national thought leaders to Kansas City, to discuss progressive topics that are relevant and timely in our industry.

You won’t want to miss the fantastic presenters lined up for 2018:

Anne Wallestad – April 26

Anne Wallestad serves as president and CEO of BoardSource, a globally-recognized nonprofit focused on strengthening nonprofit leadership at the highest level — the Board of directors.

Reserve your spot and register now.

Dr. Patrick Rooney – June 15 – Giving USA 2018: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2017

Dr. Rooney is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research and Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, and annually presents Giving USA, the longest-running and most comprehensive evaluation of philanthropic trends in the United States, here in Kansas City.

Erik Daubert – September 11

Erik is regarded as a leader in the areas of financial development and nonprofit management. In addition to a broad based career in nonprofits, he has also served as a consultant and founding partner in multiple nonprofit and for-profit organizations.

All 2018 programs will be held at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.  Stay tuned for more updates and information about our presenters.

Moving the Needle: What Might Be Possible for Philanthropy in America?

By | All Posts, Commentary, Current Events/News, Fundraising, Giving USA, Legislative + Advocacy, The Giving Institute, Uncategorized | No Comments

Leaders in the nonprofit and fundraising sector are gathering soon, through an effort spearheaded by The Giving Institute, to begin developing a plan to help increase charitable giving in America.

American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an estimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016. Total giving rose 2.7 percent in current dollars (1.4 percent adjusted for inflation) over total giving in 2015, and giving to all nine major categories of recipient organizations grew, making 2016 just the sixth time in the past 40 years that this has occurred.

This growth in giving is good.  Yet total giving as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) continues to hover around 2.0 percent as it has for the last six years. So, The Giving Institute is coordinating discussions about a national plan to “move the needle.”

JB+A President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne, who served as Board Chair of The Giving Institute from 2015-2017, is among several nonprofit thought leaders who are part of an initial “working committee” to start dialogue about an examination of giving practices and how to increase giving while incorporating input from several people from several sectors (nonprofit, government, corporate, etc.)

Approximately two dozen people will be meeting in Dallas on February 7 to continue developing components of the plan:  focus of the work, organization as a legal entity, potential leadership and staffing, funding, research, information dissemination, federal recognition, communications and building support.

This national examination of giving practices is similar to “The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs” in 1973-1975, most commonly known as “The Filer Commission.” This historical effort was spearheaded by John Filer, chairman of Aetna Insurance, and initiated by John D. Rockefeller, III, after the Tax Reform Act of 1969 was passed.  The Commission’s report, “Giving in America,”  contained recommendations that fell into three categories: 1) proposals involving taxes and giving, 2) interaction among donors, recipients and the public – those who affect the philanthropic process and 3) a proposal for a permanent commission on the nonprofit sector. The commission scrutinized government inducements to giving and considered alternatives such as tax credits and matching grant systems. Members felt the charitable deduction should be “retained and added on to rather than replaced by another form of governmental encouragement to giving.”

There were six main objectives for the commission’s final report: 1) increase the number of people who contribute significantly to and participate in nonprofit activities, 2) increase the amount of giving, 3) increase inducements to giving by those in low- and middle-income brackets, 4) preserve private choice in giving, 5) minimize income loss of nonprofit organizations that depend on the current pattern of giving and 6) be as efficient as possible (meaning, the new levels of  contributions stimulated should at least approximate the amount of government revenue foregone in order to provide this stimulus.) thought leader and participant in this critical/revolutionary time for philanthropy.

JB+A is excited to be part of this exciting and pivotal time for philanthropy – and discovering what might be possible for philanthropy in America in the years ahead.

*Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy in America, has produced comprehensive charitable giving data that are relied on by donors, fundraisers and nonprofit leaders. The research in this annual report estimates all giving to all charitable organizations across the United States.  Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA FoundationTM and is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Giving USA FoundationTM, established in 1985 by The Giving Institute, endeavors to advance philanthropy through research and education. Explore Giving USA products and resources, including free highlights of each annual report at its online store at www.givingusa.org for more information.

Tax Reform is Here, but without the Universal Charitable Deduction

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Through its membership in The Giving Institute (our President + CEO Jeffrey Byrne served as Board Chair for two years) JB+A is a member of the Charitable Giving Coalition (CGC). Below is the statement from the CGC on the final tax reform bill. Join the CGC in reaching out to your Congressional Representatives and U.S. Senators to let them know of the positive impact the charitable deduction has on philanthropy and your organization. 

12/20/17 – CGC DISAPPOINTED CONGRESS FAILS TO ENACT UNIVERSAL CHARITABLE DEDUCTION IN REFORM; VOWS TO CONTINUE PUSH IN 2018

As Congress moves to enact tax reform legislation, lawmakers are failing America’s charities. Instead of preserving a tax incentive that for the past century has helped build a strong and vibrant charitable sector, the final tax reform bill effectively eliminates the charitable deduction for 95% of all taxpayers, dealing a harsh blow to organizations on the frontlines of serving those most in need.

In real terms, more than 30 million taxpayers will no longer be able to deduct their charitable gifts, which will translate to a decline of more than $13 billion in charitable contributions annually. This decline represents between 4% and 6.5% of contributions according to studies by Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University and Tax Policy Center.

Along with leaders from charities across the country, the Charitable Giving Coalition has spent the past year urging members of Congress to address the negative impact on giving that will be triggered by increasing the standard deduction. Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers recognized this reality and its negative consequences. Unfortunately, despite clear and convincing evidence that the plans as introduced will reduce giving, the final tax bill does not include a “fix,” such as a universal charitable deduction for all taxpayers who will take the standard deduction. A universal charitable deduction would not only help recoup the anticipated loss of charitable contributions, but would also promote fairness by allowing all taxpayers to deduct their contributions.

The CGC recognizes that the final tax reform bill maintains the charitable deduction for the limited number of taxpayers who will continue to itemize. The bill also makes two positive adjustments for those taxpayers. First, it allows itemizers to deduct charitable contributions of cash up to 60% of their adjusted gross income (AGI), increasing that limitation from the current 50% level. Second, it repeals the Pease limitation, which had reduced the value of itemized deductions for higher income taxpayers.

While these changes are positive adjustments for the charitable deduction, they will, in no way, make up for the limited availability of the charitable deduction and the loss of billions of dollars in charitable contributions annually.

The stark reality for most charities is that, as government budgets continue to shrink, especially for social services and other programs that benefit communities, charitable contributions are a critical lifeline. Given this reality, it is extraordinarily short-sighted to limit incentives for private contributions to charity. Charitable contributions and the charitable tax deduction are critical for organizations doing vital work in our communities, particularly the small, local charities and congregations already being run on a shoe-string budget that are likely to be hardest-hit by reduced giving. Losing 4-6.5% of their annual budgets will be devastating to these charities and to the vulnerable communities they often serve.

The CGC is deeply committed to pursuing a universal charitable deduction when Congress reconvenes in 2018. In recent months, a groundswell of support has grown among both Republicans and Democrats in the Senate and House. Several members demonstrated they understood the implications on charitable giving of tax reform proposals. And, they acted, introducing both legislation and amendments during consideration of the tax bill. The CGC is deeply grateful for Members’ outspoken support and will build on this momentum to expand the charitable tax deduction to all American taxpayers.

To learn more about the CGC, visit protectgiving.org

See more analysis of tax reform from Dr. Patrick Rooney with the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.